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In the News: Why it’s so hard to catch cheaters

ProPublica explains how dopers are able to stay one step ahead of testers, notes that cycling is leading the way with bio-passport.

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ProPublica, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalism non-profit, has a good backgrounder up today on why and how drug cheats are able to stay ahead of the testers. The story is pegged to the leak, earlier this month, of blood tests from 5,000 track-and-field athletes that suggested 800 of them were “highly suggestive of doping or at the very least abnormal,” including 10 medal winners in endurance events at the 2012 Olympics.

But the story gives credit to cycling for leading the charge on initiatives like the biological passport and explains how those efforts, while imperfect, have served as a powerful deterrent. It also goes into the effectiveness of CIR testing for testosterone, which we explained in detail earlier this month in the wake of Tom Danielson’s positive.

When it comes to HGH, scourge of the NFL, however, it seems that right now there’s little anyone can do. According to this story, “in a study, even the subjects who were intentionally doped with HGH for research did not quite reach positive-test territory.”

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