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Wednesday’s mailbag

VeloNews.com welcomes your letters. If you run across something in thepages of VeloNews magazine or see something on VeloNews.com thatcauses you to want to write us, drop us a line at WebLetters@7Dogs.com.Please include your full name and home town. By submitting mail to thisaddress, you are consenting to the publication of your letter.Listen to the numbersI recognize that your polls are not scientific, but with such a disparitybetween road and mountain enthusiasts, why do you keep putting mountainbiking on your covers?  Maybe you should just have a section insidefor mountain stuff and leave

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VeloNews.com welcomes your letters. If you run across something in thepages of VeloNews magazine or see something on VeloNews.com thatcauses you to want to write us, drop us a line at WebLetters@7Dogs.com.Please include your full name and home town. By submitting mail to thisaddress, you are consenting to the publication of your letter.Listen to the numbersI recognize that your polls are not scientific, but with such a disparitybetween road and mountain enthusiasts, why do you keep putting mountainbiking on your covers?  Maybe you should just have a section insidefor mountain stuff and leave the covers for the discipline that your readersseem to clearly lean towards.With a road season that runs from January to October it’s not like therewould be a lot of covers to fill with pictures of century rides, the categorywith the next highest level of interest.Michael SchlitzerDon’t listen to the numbers… yetA recently as a few years ago, road cycling was considered a dying sportwith mountain biking becoming the rage.  With the success of LanceArmstrong, road cycling has reclaimed its spot at the top of the podium. Last year, VeloNews ran an article signaling the death bell for track cycling. While scanning the site, I took the recent Velo Poll and was astonishedto see my favorite activity, track cycling, with only half the votes ofwatching racing on TV.I hope it makes a comeback as Americans grasp the intricacies of trackcycling as they did short track speedskating.  I know this much, roadracing was never in as dire shape as the track is in now.Daniel Lim
New York, NYApples and orangesTo whom it may concern:I must reply to your recent comparison of the Peugeot PX 10 with a modernSpecialized. You forgot to mention a couple of facts about the bike thatsome of your younger readers (and writers) may not be aware of, not theleast of which is that you are comparing a $700 bike to one that costs$1000 more.The Peugeot PX-10 shown was exactly the same bike as1) Eddy Merckx rode to his first World Championship with.2) Tommy Simpson fell off of and died riding on Mt. Ventoux.3) Bernard Thevenet rode to his two Tour victories on. (OK slightlymodified, some gold anodization and different rear derailleur system.)My short note does not even begin to tell all the tales that this onebike is a part of.Sure the Specialized is faster and handles better than the PX -10.Butthen a new Corvette is faster than a 1960 Ferrari. The Peugeot and theFerrari are classics and always will be. I’m not so sure about the Specialized.Jack Francis
Venice, FloridaWhile we would dispute the assertion that the “PX-10 shown was exactlythe same bike as” those bikes used by Merckx, Simpson and Thevenet, wewould agree that we were comparing two distinctly different creatures.For one thing, they are separated by three decades of technology, whichis the point we were hoping to make. Nope, the Specialized is not a classicin the vein of a 1960 Ferrari, but then no one ever won a major race drivinga Ferrari while dressed in Zebra stripes either… and that has alreadybeen accomplished on that Specialized. — EditorThe subjects of too much and too little attentionDid Chris Horner actually break his foot the other day and if so whyisn’t that stuff reported compared to the dribble about tracking Pantani’slast bowel movement?Jason EdensYup, you’re right. Prime Alliance manager Roy Knickman confirms thatHorner did indeed break a bone in his foot while at home during the weekfollowing the stage race at Solano. Horner has had difficulty standingup out of the saddle and accelerating. “No we have not made a big dealabout it,” Knickman said. “We’ve intentionally kept it kind of secret.No need to let everyone know about it… Down in Florida, everyone wasout following him around and Danny (Pate) managed to get off down the roadand went on to win.”If it had to happen, said Knickman, the break couldn’t comeat a better time, “right now when the calendar is pretty weak as far asstage races go.”Horner has taken a forced rest, but will be competing at the Tourof the Gila in New Mexico and then getting ready for the Housatonic andU.S. Pro championship in Philadelphia.As for Pantani, we’ve done a search and have found not a single referenceto his bowel movements. — Editor


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