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VeloNews readers suggest we broaden our vocabulary, and critique victory salutes.

Do you want to contribute to Mailbag, a regular feature of VeloNews.com? Here's how: Keep it short. And remember that we reserve the right to edit for grammar, length and clarity.Include your full name, hometown and state or nation. Send it to webletters@insideinc.com. Quota requested Editor,

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Time to enroll in a sign language course, Mr. Contador?

Time to enroll in a sign language course, Mr. Contador?

Photo: Agence France Presse

Do you want to contribute to Mailbag, a regular feature of VeloNews.com? Here’s how:

  • Keep it short. And remember that we reserve the right to edit for grammar, length and clarity.
  • Include your full name, hometown and state or nation.
  • Send it to webletters@insideinc.com.

Quota requested
Editor,

Does the UCI have a limit on the number of times a rider can use the same stupid victory salute thingy? I’m thinking Alberto Contador — we get it, you won, “bang,” you shot me, aarrrggghhhhh … I mean seriously, isn’t it time to put that to bed?

I propose one of two solutions:

1) an outright ban on using the same stupid victory salute thingy more than twice (and in fact, once, if it involves props, like a pacifier), or

2) all professional riders fire Una Pistola each time they cross the finish line in every race, regardless of whether they’re 1st or 150th. And I mean all of them, in every race. After all, you wouldn’t want to bring a pretend knife to a pretend gunfight.

You've used up your quota, Mr. Colom.

You’ve used up your quota, Mr. Colom.

Photo: Agence France Presse

Thank you for your consideration of this important matter.
Pat “Tacos Minetti” Mause,
Tucson, Arizona

Power vocabulary
Editor,

Over the last few years, if an outsider were to read any report or story about any climbing stage or any stage that had a bit of wind and rain, I’m afraid they would think that cyclists were superheros, as opposed to mere lycra-clad mortals.

When did it become so fashionable to allow the descriptor “epic” to roll off the tongue when speaking or writing of almost anything related to our sport? The word “epic” should be left to lore and our heads should be brought back down from the clouds, lest we forget that just last year “epic” stages were won and marred by cheaters, not heroes.

In doing a simple search on your site, the word is tossed around no less than five times (not including the story about Cape Epic) in just this month, which, by the way, is not even half over. Try expanding your vocabularies.
Andrew Utz

Editor’s Note: Dang it, Andrew, you used the word three more times. Now our quota is completely used up for the month.

What up?
Editor,

Tyler Farrar wins stage 3 of Tirreno-Adriatico and you keep a picture of Contador up on your site instead of posting “our boy’s” pic crushing the fastest guys in the world??? What up???
Jeff Landauer,
Roseville, California

Editor’s Note: Sorry Jeff, it took us a while to get a pic from Italy. There was no anti-Tyler conspiracy, I promise.

Mad Antler Disease
Editor,

I am relieved to read that others are equally aggravated and alarmed at (especially) the U.S. version of roadside fanatics. I do not see the depth of cycling awareness that may at least grant Europeans a bit more leeway — for example, in Europe they are usually running alongside the racers, while here they run in front of the rider. When they inevitably tire, and peel off, they cannot see where riders are, and turn right in front of a cyclist. Bad enough, without a stupid 20-lb lethal 10-pointer on a shaky old helmet ready to gore an eye out.

The whiffle bat solution is great, if unrealistic; real, stiff, fines and arrests to set a precedent for interfering with a race, including reckless endangerment, etc. is necessary, I’m afraid.

Of course, if the jerks at Versus would not show any footage with those idiots, and certainly refrain from repeating that footage before breaks, those guys would not get the attention they crave, and the worst might just go away.
Eric Aldrich,
Boulder, Colorado

Thanks to SRAM
Editor,

As a former professional cyclist that has raced the Tour of the Gila at least a half dozen times, hats off to SRAM for stepping in and making it possible for this American classic to continue.

Silver City and the organizers of the race have always hosted a great event that is accessible to all categories from juniors to Masters, Men and women. It would have been a big blow to the local economy of Silver City, and American cycling to lose such an event.

If you have never been to Tour of the Gila, maybe this should be the year. We all need to support these types of events and the people/companies that support them. My next bike will have SRAM Red on it for sure!!
Ryan Guay,
Boulder, Colorado

Editor’s Note: The Gila is indeed a great race, and received our recommendation as a
must-do stage event. Read all about it, and other great races, in the new Race & Ride Guide.

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