Velo Magazine — April 2015

This issue of Velo takes a deep look at cycling's many gray areas — controversial subjects like unwritten rules, Strava doping, and more

The April 2015 edition of Velo is all about the gray areas of cycling, the newly emerging difficulties we are seeing in the sport today.

The biological passport can be a daunting system to the average at-home cyclist. Chris Case will break down the term and describe in detail how this tool can help officials catch riders with suspicious biological activity without actually having to find smoking-gun evidence of doping in their systems.

Caley Fretz will then explain how the process of suspending a rider based off their biological passport is possible, how the riders can challenge the sanction, and what the implications may be of this legal tug-of-war. The story highlights the case of Czech rider Roman Kreuziger, which may set a precedent for future biological passport cases.

The system that permits therapeutic use exemptions, or more commonly referred to as TUEs, may never be perfect, but recently, its flaws are becoming more apparent. Caley Fretz exposes a few of these faults and points us in a direction that could offer a more thorough and fair solution for riders.

The age-old, unwritten rules of racing: Can you attack a yellow jersey while he’s down? When is it best to wait? What about blocking? Andrew Hood will examine the thin line of what’s acceptable in the pro peloton and what may be taking the race too far.

E-bikes are becoming more and more prevalent on the streets of America. With their rise in popularity comes controversy. Should these electric motor-assisted bicycles be treated exactly like other bikes, and if not, where do they belong? Caley Fretz takes us through the multifaceted debate.

With the emergence of new technology, there are also new ways to cheat the system. On an everyday basis, we’re starting to see this happen in the Strava app and website. “Strava doping” is becoming more and more prevalent in the cycling world. Neal Rogers takes us through the ways we can self-monitor our use of this tool, and how the company is trying to patrol the virtual leader boards.

From bike frames, to wheels, all the way up to your helmet, technical writer Logan Vonbokel informs us of the frightening realities of counterfeit cycling products that are readily available on the Internet.