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Ullrich files handed over to CONI

Germany's 1997 Tour de France champion Jan Ullrich is one of 47 people whose files have been handed over to the Italian Olympic Committee (CONI), Corriere dello Sport reported Saturday. Over 100 people - snared in the 2001 Giro d'Italia police dragnet - are under formal judicial investigation by Florence magistrate Luigi Bocciolini. However while charges in the courts will be a long drawn out affair the sporting disciplinary process by CONI's anti-doping czar Giacomo Aiello will be a lot quicker and could be concluded within weeks. Bocciolini has now transmitted 47 dossiers to

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By VeloNews Interactive wire services, Copyright 2002 AFP

Germany’s 1997 Tour de France champion Jan Ullrich is one of 47 people whose files have been handed over to the Italian Olympic Committee (CONI), Corriere dello Sport reported Saturday.

Over 100 people – snared in the 2001 Giro d’Italia police dragnet – are under formal judicial investigation by Florence magistrate Luigi Bocciolini.

However while charges in the courts will be a long drawn out affair the sporting disciplinary process by CONI’s anti-doping czar Giacomo Aiello will be a lot quicker and could be concluded within weeks.

Bocciolini has now transmitted 47 dossiers to CONI and it is expected more will follow soon.

Ullrich is one of 36 riders whose cases have been handed over to CONI while 11 team directors or masseurs have also been referred to Italian sport’s supreme governing body.

But under international rules Aiello will only be able to pass on Ullrich’s case to the German federation, although CONI has the power to punish any Italian wrongdoers.

It is expected that Italy’s most famous and most controversial cyclist Marco Pantani will feature in the second wave of cases to be handed to CONI.

Police found a syringe with insulin in the hotel room of the Mercatone Uno rider in the blitz last summer at San Remo during the Giro.

Aiello has let it be known any rider that does not cooperate fully with the inquiry can expect a long ban that would rule him out of this year’s Giro.