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Six inducted into Mountain Bike Hall of Fame

The Mountain Bike Hall of Fame sits just off main street in Crested Butte, Colorado. It’s tucked into the back corner of the Crested Butte Mountain Heritage Museum and packed with a broad cross-section of mountain biking history.

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By Matt Pacocha

The Mountain Bike Hall of Fame sits just off main street in Crested Butte, Colorado. It’s tucked into the back corner of the Crested Butte Mountain Heritage Museum and packed with a broad cross-section of mountain biking history.

The most important part of that history is the people who have made it. Every year the MBHF’s current members and former inductees vote in three to seven new nominees. Nomination is open to anyone, but the bar has been set high. Of the 107 individuals and four groups currently inducted, each has played a specific role in progressing the sport’s development.

This year six individuals will be inducted on Wednesday, September 24.

The inductees and their area of contribution:

  • Bob Girvin (industry)
  • Brian Lopes (racing history)
  • John Finley Scott (pioneers)
  • Nat Ross (racing history)
  • Philip Keyes (advocacy) and
  • Steve Blick (promotion).

The Induction Ceremony is set for 6:00 p.m. during the Interbike Show at the Sand’s Expo and Convention Center immediately following the first day of the indoor show. All Interbike attendees as well as the public are invited.


About the inductees:

Bob Girvin, industry
A pioneer in suspension technology, Girvin designed the Flexstem suspension stem in 1987. He went on to design and manufacture the Offroad RF-1, which would later evolve into the ProFlex brand. The RF-1 predated Cannondale’s first suspension design by six months, making it one the first commercially manufactured full suspension bike on the market. Girvin retired in 2000.

Brian Lopes, racing history
Brian Lopes owns 25 world cup wins, four world championship titles and nine national titles over a 15-year career. For this he is a racing icon, but also the coauthor of a how-to book on mountain bike riding and a digitalized Sony PlayStation character. Lopes continues to compete in events across the board from world cup four cross to progressive competitions like Crankworx. Lopes is a mountain bike lifer and his entry into the hall of fame just adds cache to his legend.

John Finley Scott, pioneers
If you’ve seen the movie Klunkerz, you already know that the late John Finley Scott was a mountain biker before mountain biking existed. The movie shed light on his integral role in the official birth of the sport more than 20 years after he took his first ride on the ‘woodsie’ bike he built himself in 1953. Scott was one of the original investors in the MountainBikes brand started by Gary Fisher, Charlie Kelly and Tom Ritchey. Tragically, Scott was murdered in his California home in 2006.

Nat Ross, racing history
Nat Ross helped usher in the age of endurance mountain bike racing. It’s something he’s been doing for a decade. He is the longest standing member of the Subaru-Gary Fisher mountain bike team and one of the first racers to adopt the 29-inch wheel. Ross is also a coach, race promoter and owner of the non-profit women’s Tough Girl Cycling team.

Philip Keyes, advocacy
The New England Mountain Bike Association has relied on Philip Keyes’ hard work and leadership for 20 years. During this time, he helped NEMBA grow from grassroots club to one of the nation’s largest mountain bike organizations with 18 regional chapters and over 5,000 individual members. NEMBA and Keyes’ greatest success came when the organization drummed up over a quarter of a million dollars to save the ‘Vietnam’ trail system from development. The fundraising achievement gave NEMBA the honor of becoming the first club to buy land to preserve its trails.

Steve Blick, promotion
From beginnings as a childhood BMX’er, Steve Blick went from shop rat to pro cross-country racer to R&D rider for Shimano’s SKUNK program, before ending up inside the industry as a marketer for Marin, GT and finally Oakley where he works today. Blick has been at the big O for close to a decade and is loved by the two-wheeled athletes he supports from the Tour de France to Crankworx, but it’s his behind the scenes work where he takes an active role in the brand’s cycling product development that touches the everyday rider.