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Saturday’s mail: Steve Elmes is looking for a woman

Dear Editor;I hope you can help me out. On Wednesday, April 16, I was involved in a hit-and-run while riding my road bike. The accident took place on Cherryvale Road, near Boulder, Colorado, as it crosses over Route 36. Here is a summary (from a letter of thanks I wrote to Bell Helmets) of what happened:Ths is just a short note to say thanks to all the designers and engineers at Bell Sports. Two days ago, I was struck from behind while riding my road bike. According to an eye witness, the initial impact sent me backwards onto the hood of the car, where my head, encased in a Bell Ghisallo

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Dear Editor;
I hope you can help me out. On Wednesday, April 16, I was involved in a hit-and-run while riding my road bike. The accident took place on Cherryvale Road, near Boulder, Colorado, as it crosses over Route 36. Here is a summary (from a letter of thanks I wrote to Bell Helmets) of what happened:

Ths is just a short note to say thanks to all the designers and engineers at Bell Sports. Two days ago, I was struck from behind while riding my road bike. According to an eye witness, the initial impact sent me backwards onto the hood of the car, where my head, encased in a Bell Ghisallo shattered the windshield. I was then tossed off the car, onto the pavement where I rolled to a stop about 20-30 feet from the point of impact.After the initial shock, I was able to gather my wits enough to take a damage assessment. No broken bones, no loss of consciousness, no apparent major trauma other then road rash and some severe bruising to my calves (where it appears the car’s bumper plowed into me). I did suffer some road rash on top of my head, as the initial blow to the helmet shattered the very back of it and the rear support system disintegrated. However, I will take a bit of road rash (the doc says my hair will grow back) over death any day. I am confident that had I not been wearing my helmet, I would either be unable to or not be here to write this note to you. My injuries will heal, my bike and other items can be replaced (but not by her insurance, she left the scene of the accident and there is a warrant out for her), but I can’t be replaced. Extend my thanks to everyone at Bell/Giro for their hard work and efforts. I owe them my life.

Since the accident, I have had to deal with the increasing damage to my body. The whiplash has kicked in, my back is a wreck, and the road rash makes sleeping all but impossible. Still, I am thankful to be alive, as everything will hopefully heal and bikes can be replaced. Now for the good news: not one of my tattoos was touched by road rash.I could use some help from anyone who lives in the area, by the way. The police are still looking for the driver. What I know about the woman who hit me is this, she was driving an early to-mid 90’s Toyota Camry. Color was a dark bluish/green. The windshield on the passenger’s side is shattered and there should be body damage to the hood and bumper. She is in her mid-to-late 60’s, wears glasses. The accident took place on April 16th at around 2:00 p.m. Actually, she stopped about 30 yards away, sat in her car for a few minutes, walked around her car for a few more minutes, then casually strolled over and asked me if I was ok. I said (bleeding from a head wound) “No, I am pretty far from ok.”I was talking to another man, who called 911 and stopped traffic so I wouldn’t get run over (He was the eye witness) and suddenly he picked his head up and noticed she had driven away! If anyone remembers seeing the accident or sees her car, could they please contact the Colorado State Police, Trooper Hinshaw at 303/469-1966.I am hoping that maybe I will get lucky. Frankly, I just want her or her insurance to replace my bike and be prepared to handle any additional medical bills my insurance may not cover.Thanks,Steven Elmes
Sjelmes@aol.com

P.S. UCI ruling or no UCI ruling, the Euro look is out for me.We remember Steven from the old days when he was at Independent Fabrication. We’re happy to help. And thank your lucky stars those tat’s survived, Steven. Those things must have cost even more than that I.F. you were riding! — EditorOh for days gone by
Editor:
I’m betting now that Scott Moninger is wishing the USOC was still incharge of drug testing, like in the bad old days, and that the inadvertentuse of doping products was a viable defense.

Steve Crossley

Tweaks can’t handle a crit? Puh-leeze
Editor:
C’mon, now, really. How many times a week does a mountain-bike racerride the road, or race on the road, during the year? And they are professionals,right? They should be able to navigate around a criterium course for 60minutes without toppling all over each other like clowns and being “scaredshitless.” What a bunch of tweaks.

Todd Shoberg

Could be worse. Ever seen a draft-legal triathlon? – Editor

Can’t we all just get along?
Editor:
The recent letter by David La Porte (see “Officialgot it wrong, too”) suggests a lingering chip on his shoulder regardingofficials. I didn’t see a whole lot of arrogance in Charles Matthews’ letter;he just stated the way things are done. If a chief commissaire has concernsabout course safety, he or she asks for changes. If they are not made,then the race must be either canceled or postponed.

Whenever possible, the chief inspects the course well ahead of the race,allowing ample time for any changes to be made. As Mr. La Porte accuratelyput it, “A successful event is the result of a partnership between thepromoter, officials, riders and sponsors.” Taking it one step further,the cycling community at large is based on this same partnership, so pleasethink twice before accusing another of perceived arrogance. As a commissaire,organizer and occasional racer, I know very well how important good relationsare. Be nice, okay?

Besides, karma does exist – maybe you’ll run a national or UCI-sanctionedrace one day and find Mr. Matthews reporting for work.

Wally James
Penticton, British Columbia, Canada

Sea Otter snafus bode ill for future
Editor:
I’m more than just a little concerned about how this year’s Sea OtterClassic, the biggest road event here in the Monterey Bay area, was plannedand carried out. After the Redwood City road race went wrong, the Sea Otterspokesperson took a positive attitude:

“As for the remainder of the race, we have three stages,in preparation for which we have gone through the same methodical trainingof support staff and preparation of facilities, and we are confident thatthese stages are safe and challenging, and will go off without undue incident.”
Yeah, right. Late Thursday night I saw on cyclingnews.com that the criteriumin Santa Cruz had been canceled and replaced by a circuit race at the LagunaSeca Raceway near Monterey.

The folks at Sea Otter said that they were changing the venue to providea more challenging stage for the male riders since they nullified the RedwoodCity stage. That is important; however, they did it without the slightestinterest in the public. They made no effort to get the info about the changeto the local media – I only read about it late Thursday night on cyclingnews.com,via Australia! Had you gone to the Sea Otter website you really would havehad to have gone out of your way to find out about the change. They seemmore interested in letting you know you can’t bring your dog to LagunaSeca this year than telling you about the change in venue.

Usually, these events bring big tourist bucks to Monterey, and it wasa great gesture to share some of the wealth with the sagging tourist economyof Santa Cruz. A group of friends and I planned to go to the race, cheeron Prime Alliance, and then have dinner and suds at a local brewery. Turnsout the big money makers were the parking lots at Laguna Seca.

My feeling is that if those folks can plan this event so badly, howare they going to do when they expand the Sea Otter with the Redlands Classicinto a two-week “Tour of California”-type deal next year?
 
Richard Marks
Watsonville, CA

Pezcycling’s pen pal burps bile
Editor:
With regard to Charles Manantan’s little burp-up of bile (See “Dumband dumber”), presumably with regard to O’Grady’s column (see “Friday’sfoaming rant: A tale told by an idiot“):

“That’s the single most mindless and self-absorbed babbleabout absolutely nothing I have ever wasted my time reading.”
I have to wonder how a contributor to one cycling web publication can beallowed to so freely and flippantly nip at the ankles of another withinthe confines of its own editorial pages. And, more importantly, will Ibe afforded the same courtesy when I write in to pezcycling.com?

Ryan Newill

We like Pez, but we didn’t know they had a bile flavor out. Soundskinda yucky. Do they have a Robbie McEwen dispenser for that one? -Editor



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