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Wednesday’s EuroFile: Astarloa injured; Wesemann becomes Swiss

Astarloa sidelinedSpain's 2003 world road race cycling champion Igor Astarloa is set to be on the sidelines for the next two months due to a double fracture of his right arm and wrist, his Italian team Barloworld revealed on Wednesday. The 28-year-old suffered the injuries during a race in Marseille, France, last Sunday and will have to rest for a month before resuming training towards the end of March. It will mean Astarloa missing the opening classic races of the season including Milan-San Remo. Wesemann drops German citizenshipT-Mobile's Steffen Wesemann has announced that he

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By VeloNews Interactive, with wire services

Astarloa sidelined
Spain’s 2003 world road race cycling champion Igor Astarloa is set to be on the sidelines for the next two months due to a double fracture of his right arm and wrist, his Italian team Barloworld revealed on Wednesday.

The 28-year-old suffered the injuries during a race in Marseille, France, last Sunday and will have to rest for a month before resuming training towards the end of March.

It will mean Astarloa missing the opening classic races of the season including Milan-San Remo.

Wesemann drops German citizenship
T-Mobile’s Steffen Wesemann has announced that he plans to take Swiss citizenship.

Speaking with Het Nieuwsblad in advance of Saturday’s Het Volk, Wesemann explained that he no longer feels comfortable in his native Germany, echoing a sentiment often voiced by his fellow former East Germans.

“Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, the feeling of fellowship in Germany is gone,” Wesemann said. “Lots of people are disillusioned.” He said, “I wanted to leave, that was certain. The question was, where to go? Now I have a place to regard as home.”