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UCI to ban doping violators from team staff positions

The UCI management committee has approved measures that would prevent anyone who has violated cycling’s anti-doping regulations to be employed in the sport.

The UCI management committee has approved measures that would prevent anyone who has violated cycling’s anti-doping regulations to be employed in the sport.

The measure was one of several voted in at a Management Committee meeting in Masstricht, the Netherlands, on Friday, and was originally proposed by the Professional Cycling Council (PCC).

The PCC comes under the aegis of the UCI but represents all the different actors in elite cycling from professional teams to race organizers.

While banned riders are barred from taking an active role in the sport during the time of their respective suspensions, the UCI decision takes that a step further and eliminates the option of a banned rider from going to work for a team after the suspension is over.

The measure goes into effect on July 1, and will not be applied retroactively. The rule will not affect a manager like Bjarne Riis, who admitted to doping during his 1996 Tour de France victory and now runs the Saxo Bank-Sungard team. However, the new policy (UCI rule 1.1.006.2) means that any rider who violates UCI anti-doping rules after that date will be inelligible to obtain the license need to work on a UCI-recognized team.

“The UCI Management Committee is fully aware of the difficulties that the adoption of such a measure could imply,” the governing body noted in a statement issued Friday, “but wishes to once again reconfirm its determination to take all steps possible to oppose any form of illegal practice in our sport.”

The UCI also ratified a provision that will now make teams responsible for the total costs generated by a doping case. Those costs are currently assumed by the UCI.