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Tuesday’s EuroFile: Dajka back on track; Nelyubin killed in Russia

Australian sprint cyclist Jobie Dajka will return to international competition later this week at the Manchester World Cup after serving a ban for lying to a doping inquiry. On Tuesday the former world keirin champion was named to a team of six riders slated to compete in the January 7-9 UCI Track Cycling World Cup. Dajka was thrown off Australia's Athens Olympics team last year and suspended until January 1 when it was found he had lied to a doping inquiry headed by Justice Robert Anderson.

By AFP

Jobie Dajka

Jobie Dajka

Photo: AFP (file photo)

Australian sprint cyclist Jobie Dajka will return to international competition later this week at the Manchester World Cup after serving a ban for lying to a doping inquiry.

On Tuesday the former world keirin champion was named to a team of six riders slated to compete in the January 7-9 UCI Track Cycling World Cup.

Dajka was thrown off Australia’s Athens Olympics team last year and suspended until January 1 when it was found he had lied to a doping inquiry headed by Justice Robert Anderson.

Anderson was looking into allegations that Dajka and four other Olympic squad members had injected substances in the room of disgraced fellow track cyclist Mark French.

None of the five riders were convicted of doping offences, but Dajka was suspended for a code of conduct violation. Australia – Jobie Dajka, Shane Kelly, Ben Kersten, Katherine Bates, Kerrie Meares, Alexis Rhodes. Coach: Martin Barras.

Olympian Nelyubin killed in New Year celebration
Dmitry Nelyubin, a member of the 1988 Soviet team pursuit squad, has died after being stabbed during the New Year celebrations.

Russian cycling federation press officer Konstantin Boitsov told AFP that Nelyubin, 33, who won gold at the Seoul Olympics with the Soviet pursuit team, was attacked by a group of men on January 1 in the yard of a friend’s house in St. Petersburg.

Nelyubin and two friends were rushed to hospital after they all were stabbed. However, doctors were unable to save the life of the Olympic champion.

Then just 17-years-old, Nelyubin teamed with Giantautas Umaras, Arturas Kasputis and Viatcheslav Ekimov in winning the gold in the team pursuit in Seoul. He later embarked on a relatively anonymous career in the professional peloton between 1993 and 1997.