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Tirreno-Adriatico returns to Terminillo for 2017

Organizers announce the 2017 Tirreno-Adriatico route, which will include the famous Terminillo climb, where Nairo Quintana won in 2015.

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The Terminillo, a famous 16-kilometer climb where Nairo Quintana won in 2015, returns to Tirreno-Adriatico’s route for 2017, race organizer RCS Sport announced Thursday. The Italian race takes place March 8-14.

The 1,012.8km, seven-day stage race starts and finishes with time trials, as is customary, with a flat team time trial in stage 1 and a short individual time trial in stage 7. Stages 2, 3, and 5 aren’t pure mountain stages, but they offer enough climbing to favor versatile riders, such as Zdenek Stybar, who won in Pomarance in 2016. Stage 4, with its mountaintop finish on the Terminillo, should decide the overall classification with an average gradient of 7.3 percent on the final climb. Stage 6 should be the only true sprinters’ stage, with a flat, straight run to the oceanside finish.

Tirreno-Adriatico 2017 stages

March 8, stage 1: Team time trial, Lido di Camaiore, 22.7km
March 9, stage 2: Camaiore to Pomarance, 228km
March 10, stage 3: Monterotondo Marittimo to Montalto di Castro, 204km
March 11, stage 4: Montalto di Castro to Terminillo, 171km
March 12, stage 5: Rieti to Fermo, 209km
March 13, stage 6: Ascoli Piceno to Civitanova Marche, 168km
March 14, stage 7: Time trial, San Benedetto del Tronto, 10.1km

Tirreno-Adriatico has often been affected by wintery weather. Quintana, Movistar’s Colombian climber, won atop the Terminillo in a snowstorm, and he went on to claim the overall in 2015. In 2016, conditions were even worse, and organizers were forced to cancel the queen stage to Monte san Vicino. BMC’s Greg Van Avermaet, rarely considered a threat for overall classification, was the unlikely winner in that edition of Tirreno.