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Sinkewitz denies passing info on teammates to feds

Disgraced German cyclist Patrik Sinkewitz on Wednesday has denied reports claiming he made allegations about former T-Mobile teammates' doping practices to federal officers. "I did not say anything concrete on the doping practices of other riders," Sinkewitz told German tabloid Bild on Wednesday. "I do not know where this information comes from."

By Agence France Presse

Disgraced German cyclist Patrik Sinkewitz on Wednesday has denied reports claiming he made allegations about former T-Mobile teammates’ doping practices to federal officers.

“I did not say anything concrete on the doping practices of other riders,” Sinkewitz told German tabloid Bild on Wednesday. “I do not know where this information comes from.”

On Saturday, an article in Sueddeutsche Zeitung charged that Sinkewitz, who is serving a one-year ban for a failed drugs test, had passed on detailed allegations about former teammates, including Andreas Klöden and Matthias Kessler.

Klöden, who finished second in the 2004 Tour de France, has threatened legal action over the allegations.

Kessler, a T-Mobile rider until 2007, was sacked by Astana last July for a positive drugs test for abnormally high levels of testosterone.

Sinkewitz himself was sacked by T-Mobile in July 2007 after a positive drugs test.

To have his ban reduced to one year, Sinkewitz has been working with investigating officers to give information about his former team, especially as regards its practices during the 2006 Tour de France.

The 27-year-old winner of the 2004 Tour of Germany told Bild he had lost around 1 million euros through lost earnings and sponsorship contracts since his fall from grace.

He is trying to find a new team for July 2008 when his ban finishes.

“I train daily for up to five hours per day, I want to show that I can be powerful,” Sinkewitz said.