Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Road

Frank Pipp’s power output

Health-Net-Maxxis rider has been front and center for this Tour de Georgia, grabbing the KOM lead on stage 1 and figuring in a long four-man breakaway on Wednesday's stage 3. Pipp's coach Frank Overton has been sharing Pipp's wattage readings and providing VeloNews readers with some analysis after every stage. He's tickled pink that Pipp has been playing such a central role in the race.

Don't miss a moment from Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, to the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you join Outside+.

How much more work did Pipp do than stage winner Greg Henderson?

Pipp churning out the watts in Wednesday's breakaway.

Pipp churning out the watts in Wednesday’s breakaway.

Photo: Casey B. Gibson

Health-Net-Maxxis rider has been front and center for this Tour de Georgia, grabbing the KOM lead on stage 1 and figuring in a long four-man breakaway on Wednesday’s stage 3.

Pipp’s coach Frank Overton has been sharing Pipp’s wattage readings and providing VeloNews readers with some analysis after every stage.

He’s tickled pink that Pipp has been playing such a central role in the race.

“Shazaam — I could not have scripted this any better unless he was winning the stages,” Overton said. “Well, that’s an exaggeration but it is nicer than writing about a racer who’s just sitting in. It’s interesting that Pipp has been off the front for 40 percent of the race.

“Here’s a quick race recap: he bridged to the breakaway in stage 1 and drove it, rocked the KOM @ 874 watts in stage 2 yesterday, and today powered a 4-man breakaway all day, contesting all the sprints and winning two.”

First the numbers for Wednesday’s stage:
Breakaway power = 325 watts for 2 1/2 hours and 103 kilometers. “That’s at 90 percent of Pipp’s threshold power so you know it hard,” Overton said.

Peak sprint power =1,396 watts for 6 seconds to win the second bonus sprint.

What kind of power does it take to get in a breakaway at the Tour of Georgia? At 58k into the race, Pipp stepped on it for 14 seconds and 868 watts, drafted on a wheel for 32 seconds at 394 watts, and then stepped on the gas for another 12 seconds and 722 watts.

“So 576 watts for 58 seconds is all it took. Easy right? Well the catch is that you gotta keep going at 90 percent of your threshold power for 2 1/2 more hours!.

“Pipp prepared for these types of breakaways by mimicking the specific power demands in his training. On March 18th during a 4:45 ride with 3,718kJ’s, I motorpaced him for 100 minutes with four “sprint arounds.” These are max sprints around the moto at 50 kph with 10 minutes of recovery back at 50kph inbetween. On the third sprint around, he did 1,406 watts, which is similar to his sprint power today, just without the two hours of attacks and counterattacks.

The benefit of sitting in

“I found it quite interesting that Frank belted out 3,980kJ’s while Gregg Henderson only needed 2,970 kJ’s to win. This is the difference between being in the break all day and sitting in. A great example of energy conservation. You can bet that the GC guys were also conserving for the next three days. Who conserved the best so they can make the most power later in the race? Email me the files and I’ll determine the winner (total kJ’s / body weight) in stage 4’s power write up.”

In three stages here are the numbers Pipp has put up so far:
11.3 hours
9,614 kJ’s
364k
143k in breakaways (40 percent of the total race).
Max power efforts included: 1 bridge, 1 KOM, 2 breakaways and 3 bonus point sprints.

For more details on Pipp’s power recordings, you can see the full record at www.fascatcoaching.com