Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

News

In the News: Study finds asthma rife among elite athletes

A British study finds that one-third of Team Sky is prone to asthma, and 70 percent of elite UK swimmers have some form of the condition

Don't miss a moment from Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, to the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you join Outside+.

The Guardian reports that a new study finds that 70 percent of top UK swimmers and third of Team Sky cyclists suffer from some form of asthma, especially exercise-induced asthma.

It’s not unknown for elite athletes to have asthma — marathoner Paula Radcliffe and soccer player Paul Scholes are among well-known British examples — but the good news for wheezy children wistfully dreaming of a sporting career is that research is increasingly uncovering just how many asthmatics there are in top-level sport.

In fact, the figures can seem astonishing. John Dickinson from Kent university, a world expert on asthma in sport, who has tested all 33 UK-based swimmers from the British Swimming squad found 70 percent have some form of asthma. A similar test on the cyclists from Team Sky revealed about a third are prone to a wheeze, against a national asthma rate of about 8 to 10 percent.

The picture is, inevitably, a bit more complicated. While a few have so-called classic asthma, the largely allergy-triggered constriction of the bronchial tubes that usually begins in childhood, Dickinson tests for what is known as exercise-induced asthma, or EIA.

Read more >>