Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Mountain

MTB News and Notes: It’s all about the money

There’s still no word as to whether or not the folks running the 2004 NORBA series are going to be able to come up with enough sponsorship support to offer a pro prize purse next summer, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be any money on offer for mountain biking’selite.Organizers of the Jeep King of the Mountain series have confirmed thatthey will again be putting on three events next summer. And while datesand locations have yet to be set, they’ve said the prize purse will be at least what it was last summer ($100,000).Next comes word that an event billing itself as the U.S. Open Of

Don't miss a moment from Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, to the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you join Outside+.

By Jason Sumner, VeloNews associate editor

There’s still no word as to whether or not the folks running the 2004 NORBA series are going to be able to come up with enough sponsorship support to offer a pro prize purse next summer, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be any money on offer for mountain biking’selite.Organizers of the Jeep King of the Mountain series have confirmed thatthey will again be putting on three events next summer. And while datesand locations have yet to be set, they’ve said the prize purse will be at least what it was last summer ($100,000).Next comes word that an event billing itself as the U.S. Open Of MountainBiking will be back in 2004, and will feature a purse of “at least $20,000.”The event will take place at the Diablo Freeride Park in Vernon, New Jersey, May 29-30.“Our goal is to attract high-caliber riders by offering them the typeof cash purse they clearly deserve,” said Clayton Harper, co-owner of theDiablo Freeride Park. The event will be a pro-am format, giving up-and-comingamateurs a chance to compete against top-level pros.This will be the second running of the event. Last season it took placein early September, the same time as the world mountain bike championships.“This year we’re trying to fit into the scheme of the NORBA scheduleso more people will come out,” explained the park’s other co-owner, ShawnOrecchio, adding that there were still some details to be worked out regarding the full event schedule. “There will definitely be a downhill. The question is whether we have a cross-country or go in a more freeride/slopestyle direction. Our business is definitely more freeride oriented, but we don’t want to ignore the cross-country side of things either.”This coming summer will be the second season of operation for the DiabloFreeride Park. Right now, according to Orecchio, the park has 30 downhill/freeridetrails and 30 miles of cross-country trails. Lift service is provided by an eight-person gondola. Last year, season passes cost $289 and a day pass was $28. Orecchio says the price of admission will decrease slightly next season.“For a long time the only option in this area was Plattekill, but that’sabout three hours from New York City,” said Orecchio. “Were only aboutan hour away, so we thought we were really filling a need.”The park is set on the grounds of Mountain Creek Resort, a ski resortwith 11 lifts and 45 trails. Orecchio says there is a 1000 feet of verticaland about three square miles of terrain.“We had about 5000 [mountain bikers] come out last summer and we wereonly open on the weekends,” said Orecchio, who added that the park features“lots of rocky, rutty and off-camber trails.
There’s no beginner terrain.”Narrow escape
Had a brief correspondence with downhiller April Lawyer last week.She and her family were among the many thousands of people who had theirlives turned upside down by the rash of wildfires that tore through Southern California. But Lawyer and her family, who live in the Big Bear Lake area in San Bernadino Country, were among the lucky.“All my families homes were saved and they were able to go home [lastWednesday],” Lawyer wrote in an e-mail. “My grandparent’s house was onlya few feet shy of burning. The firemen foamed their house to prevent it from burning. It brings new meaning to Thanksgiving this year.”Brief explanation
Finally got a response from the UCI regarding what happened with theAngle Fire World Cup, which at one point seemed like a sure thing but endedup being left off of next year’s schedule. This comes courtesy of the UCI’s Christophe Burri.

“It is unfortunate that there’s no round of the 2004 UCI MTBWorld Cup in the U.S. But due to the economic situation with the series(no new sponsorship had been found at the time of the decision). And alsosince the only bid in the U.S. couldn’t provide a guarantee of revenueon time, the UCI Mountain Bike Commission preferred not to retain the bidin order to avoid problems that we had in 2003 (primarily the late cancellationof the Telluride World Cup). However, we are already working with USA Cyclingand the bidding organizer for 2005 in order to secure a potential bid inthe U.S.”
Christophe Burri.

Quote of the week
This one comes courtesy of gated specialist Brian Lopes, who was askedwhat his racing plans were in light of the scheduling conflicts betweenthe NORBA and World Cup series next year (there are three event overlaps).

I would have to say I’ll be doing the World Cup circuit. SinceNORBA has no [prize] money, and since USA Cycling does nothing for us four-crossracers who are the sole source of  medals at world’s, why should Igo to their events?

Brian Lopes

Marla on tour
Following the release of her autobiography “The Life Story of a DownhillGravity Goddess” Marla Streb has been on the road, doing a nationwide booktour. Streb told me that it’s been one of the toughest grinds she’s everencountered, but she’s having fun with it nonetheless. Here’s some infoon the remaining tour dates.Phoenix — Barnes and Noble
21001 N. Tatum blvd.  Suite 42
480/538-8520
November 13, 7 p.m.Lafayette, CA — Lafayette Books
3579 Mount Diablo Blvd.
925/284-1250
November 14, 7 p.m.Oakland — Barnes and Noble
98 Broadway
510/272-0120
November 16, 3 p.m.Santa Cruz — Capitola Book Café
1475 41st Ave.
831/462-4415
November 17, 7:30 p.m.San Diego
TBD
November 18Portland — Fat Tire Farm
2714 NW Thurmon
503/222-3276
November 19, 5 p.m.Seattle — Elliot Bay Book Company
101 S. Main
206/624-6640
November 20, 7 p.m.