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Mountain

License to Ride Proposed for Idaho

If approved, the new "mountain biking" Idaho license plate would create a revenue stream for the building, maintenance and expansion of trails.

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A proposed bill would create a special use license plate that would generate money for trail building and upkeep in Idaho.
A proposed bill would create a special use license plate that would generate money for trail building and upkeep in Idaho.

Mountain bikers in Idaho are proposing a special license plate that would generate funds for trail building, maintenance and expansion.

The idea was started by Geoff Baker, a Boise resident, avid mountain biker and a board member of the Southwest Idaho Mountain Biking Association (SWIMBA).With the assistance of a lobbyist working pro-bono, Baker has enlisted the support of Idaho state Rep. Brian Cronin to sponsor the proposal. A bill is currently being presented to the Idaho House and Senate.

If approved, the new “mountain biking” Idaho license plate would create a revenue stream for the Idaho State Parks and Recreation Department to use for trails, according to Baker’s blog and Facebook site. Any trail group could apply for the money, but the funds, by law, would be permitted to be used only for trails that are open to mountain but not restricted to just mountain biking. That means equestrians, hikers, dog walkers, runners and off-highway vehicles would benefit.

As with other special purpose plates in Idaho, motorists pay an extra fee for the plates: $25 from the original purchase and $15 from each renewal will go into a state fund earmarked for trail creation and maintenance, according to the Idaho Statesman.

Although a board member of SWIMBA, Baker said the license plate project is not an effort of the group but his own concept. He said the bill could help the Idaho State Parks and Recreation Department at a time when it will cut $4.5 million from its budget.

Check out more about mountain biking in and around Boise, Idaho.