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Legals Ironed Out for 2012 XC Venue

New site was chosen last year to replace initial venue after the UCI ruled that it was not challenging enough.

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Final planning for the 2012 London Olympics cross-country can begin at the 550-acre Hadleigh Castle Country Park. Courtesy photo
Final planning for the 2012 London Olympic cross-country can begin at the 550-acre Hadleigh Castle Country Park. Courtesy photo

After the UCI rejected the site of the first 2012 London Olympic cross-country course because it was too easy, organizers and landowners of a new property are coming to terms.

Legal agreements between London 2012 officials and the Salvation Army have been worked out so final planning can begin at the 550-acre Hadleigh Castle Country Park and adjacent land owned by the Salvation Army.

According to Insidethegames.biz, the two parties agreed in principle last summer and have been ironing out final details since. Under the agreement, the Olympic course will be available for use by recreational riders once the Games are finished.

The cross-country site overlooks the Thames Estuary. It was chosen last year to replace Weald Country Park after the UCI ruled that it was not challenging enough for the sport’s top riders competing in an Olympics.

The Olympic course will be set against the backdrop of the 700-year-old ruins of Hadleigh Castle, which was built in the 1230s during the reign of King Henry III.

A newsletter will be sent to area residents by the end of the month updating them on the plans and a planning application is expected to be submitted by spring next year.