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Mountain

Hydrapak Morro

Return to main story [nggallery id=169] Hydrapak Morro MSRP:  $109.99 Fluid Capacity:  100oz/3L Cargo Capacity:  800 cubic inches/13.1 liters Colors Available: Black (tested), orange Weight: 1lb 13oz Available: Now Helmet compatible? Not officially, so if you’re in to that kind of…

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[nggallery id=169]

Hydrapak Morro
MSRP:  $109.99
Fluid Capacity:  100oz/3L
Cargo Capacity:  800 cubic inches/13.1 liters
Colors Available: Black (tested), orange
Weight: 1lb 13oz
Available: Now

Helmet compatible? Not officially, so if you’re in to that kind of thing you’ll have to buckle it to the carry strap or one of the compression straps, which actually hold a full-face helmet reasonably well.

Media pocket? Sort of; there is a top pocket with two internal mesh pockets and a key clip that has a headphone port.

Pros: This is a nice, somewhat streamlined and light-weight-feeling pack. At 800 cubic inches, you’ll have to come up with a better excuse than not having room for rain gear when you get soaked from a mid-summer downpour. The main compartment is easily-accessible via split zippers that allow access almost all the way to the bottom of the pack, and the internal pockets in said compartment don’t seem to impede its space even if they’re stuffed to their small capacity. And if you go over the zippers’ capacity, the four exterior compression straps have enough slack that you could still safely strap down a load. Personally, I’d rather see the straps a little more streamlined, but they do lend to the creative packer.

Hydrapak’s Reversible 2 reservoir is a nice feature for people who like to keep things clean, as turning the bladder inside out leaves almost no place for funk to flourish. And with the ability to remove the reservoir from the drink tube at the push of a button, there’s no reason to dip your pack into last night’s soaking spaghetti pot while trying to fill up the tethered bladder in the kitchen sink. This system didn’t leak more than a drip or two during connection and disconnection, either, which was quite impressive.

Riders with medium-to-smaller torsos will like the way this pack fits, and it seems like it’s adjustable enough for bigger riders like myself to get by with, too.

The locking mechanism on the bite valve works very well, is essentially impossible to accidentally knock open and didn’t leak at all on our rides when it was in the open position.

Cons: The most frustrating part of this pack was hose management. It comes with a removable magnet system that clips to the pack and shoulder strap, which is a good idea in theory, but the magnet itself proved to be too weak to keep the drink tube in place on even the most mellow of trails. I ended up removing the magnet and ran the tube through the strap loop, but the tube tended to curl under my arm, and was almost never where I wanted it to be positioned when it came time to take a sip.

While the main compartment was fantastically accessible, the two top exterior compartments were too small to be realistically used with my size-large hands, and even my friend’s petite wife with hands that would make any pick-pocket envious gave the accessibility a small thumbs down. And speaking of exterior pockets, another friend who has this pack said she doesn’t like the lack of open-mouthed pocket on the back where food can be easily accessed during riding, especially since the pack is big enough on her to cover jersey pockets.

There isn’t any reflective material, so if you’re prone to riding at night don’t forget your blinky, which can be easily attached to a strap across the lower back of the pack.

Bottom line: First and foremost, this pack feels small on my larger frame. So even if the hose were better-positioned, the exterior pockets better accessed and had more adequate ventilation, I’d still stick with my old pack by the fit factor alone. Otherwise, smaller riders looking for a lightweight pack with a lot of storage may find the Morro to be a great option.

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