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Mountain

Deuter Hydrolite 3.0

Return to main story [nggallery id=170] Deuter Hydrolite 3.0 MSRP: $68.95 Fluid Capacity: 100oz/3L Cargo Capacity:  N/A Colors Available: Black/titan (tested) Weight: 1lb 9oz Available:  Now Helmet compatible? Not officially, but again, you can clip an XC helmet to just about…

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[nggallery id=170]

Deuter Hydrolite 3.0
MSRP: $68.95
Fluid Capacity: 100oz/3L
Cargo Capacity:  N/A
Colors Available: Black/titan (tested)
Weight: 1lb 9oz
Available:  Now

Helmet compatible? Not officially, but again, you can clip an XC helmet to just about anything. This one isn’t full-face compatible though.

Media pocket? No.

Pros: Want a minimalist hydration pack? This is a great choice. With the most ventilated shoulder straps I’ve witnessed, in combination with Deuter’s Airstripes back ventilation, it’s hard to tell there’s even a pack on your back on even the hottest of days.

Though I didn’t press the mylar-lined, insulated reservoir pocket’s limits, this pack seemed the least affected by outside temperature influence than any of the packs we rode with thus far.

Dueter uses a Source reservoir, which has a wide-mouth top for easy cleaning/filling access, and a twist-lock bite valve that seems to be immune to accidentally opening.

Though this pack is obviously tailored to the minimalist, there is still a reflective loop at the bottom that could house a blinking light, and a zippered pocket that could hold an energy bar, an I.D. and a couple of dollars, but not much more.

Cons: My biggest issue with this hydration pack is that while minimalism is appreciated, it seems silly to have a cycling pack that literally doesn’t have room for a spare tube, much less a tube, C02 kit and multi-tool.

The drink tube was a bit short for my liking, and the hard plastic dust cap for the bite valve that’s leashed to the drink tube via a little hand-tied cord has to go.

Bottom line: This is a great pack for someone who runs a saddle bag with all the trailside repair necessities, but honestly, that doesn’t sound like most mountain bikers I know. Without the option to carry the bare minimum, I’m going to have to stick with my old pack.

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