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More on Horner and the Olympics

Do you want to contribute to Mailbag, a regular feature of VeloNews.com? Here's how: Keep it short. And remember that we reserve the right to edit for grammar, length and clarity. Include your full name, hometown and state or nation. Send it to webletters@insideinc.com. Olympics live feed is awesome Editors,

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Do you want to contribute to Mailbag, a regular feature of VeloNews.com? Here’s how:

  • Keep it short. And remember that we reserve the right to edit for grammar, length and clarity.
  • Include your full name, hometown and state or nation.
  • Send it to webletters@insideinc.com.

Olympics live feed is awesome
Editors,

While it sounds like the primetime coverage of the men’s road race sucked, I was completely blown away by the live internet feed. No commentators killing time, just the sounds of motorcycles, the rider and the fans.

Awesome scenery, the only disappointment was that I missed the first two hours trying to get some sleep. After seeing the Tour de France live on Eurosport, Tour de Georgia live on WSCN and this Olympics, I can only hope every race has some live feed from here on out.
Tom Butler,
Atlanta, Georgia

Editor’s Note: Some of us have been enjoying the late-night online coverage, too. The lack of commentary — and the late hour — allow us to practice our Phil Liggett imitation. You can find it here, by the way.

Pride of Place
Editor,

OK, OK. It’s a small thing, but …

Armstrong won gold in the Olympic TT and she’s an American and VeloNews is headquartered in the States, and yet you lead out with the men’s TT in your joint story of the two races. This seems to make the woman and her triumph an afterthought. Here’s the deal: Gold (Armstrong) is better than bronze (Leipheimer), winning for your country is a great thing, and Cancellara, as much a class act as he is — is Swiss!

Let’s put Kristin Armstrong at the top of the page! She’s on top of the podium, after all.
Jane Kyle,
Portland, Oregon

Editor’s Note: Readers should know that Jane Kyle and I exchanged several pleasant emails on this subject and we have agreed to disagree. We ran a photo of Armstrong in the lead position on the homepage, and the story began with a report on Cancellara’s win, a compromise that accounted for our pride in an American gold medal and our awe regarding Cancellara’s increasingly historic palmarès. Thanks again for your interest, Jane. And if I had to do it again? Two stories.

More on Horner
Editors,

I love the way Chris Horner rides and I also wish he was selected for the Beijing Olympics. However, I can’t agree with the writers of the letters you just published online. Horner has a tendency of being a poor loser. His rant after the Tour of Georgia is a case in point. According to him, Astana and Leipheimer lost the race because Garmin-Chipotle didn’t do its job; nevertheless, his team was the best in the race. Huh?

And now Horner has to crap on Jason McCartney. I can easily say Will Firschkorn and Danny Pate, coming out of the Tour in great form, deserved a spot more than Horner. What is Horner’s basis for saying that he deserved the fifth spot more than anyone else? There is nothing wrong with expressing disappointment but do it with class, Horner.
Ken G Kabira,
Naperville, Illinois

Another Horner response from Iowa
Chris – hmmmmm

Let’s look at some facts as stated in the article …

“Horner has never been selected to an Olympic squad. He was left off the U.S. team in 1996 despite being the top-ranked rider in the country. In 2000 and 2004 USA Cycling used automatic and discretionary criteria in addition to Olympic qualifying events, won in 2000 by Antonio Cruz and in 2004 by McCartney.”

So let’s get this straight. You were not on the ’96 team? Why? And then in 2000 and 2004 you didn’t make it? That’s strange. If you are so good then why not selected?

Let’s look at your reasons why …

“The decision either comes down to politics, brownnosing, they just don’t like me or they are idiots. It must be politics, because nobody is that stupid.”

Politics: Maybe
Brownnosing: Nope.. Jason never contacted anyone and pitched his story.
They just don’t like me: Why would you think that? Good point though.
They are idiots: calling the people responsible for the decision ‘idiots’ won’t get you too far.

So the answer is: It’s politics — because nobody (the idiots) likes you.

You seem to think that riding for the USA is your right. It’s not. It’s a PRIVILEGE. Acting like a spoiled little brat doesn’t help your case, its about representing the country and being respectful and humble.

Yea, Jason is great guy! He does what is asked and NEVER complains. He simply loves riding his bike, and is damn good at it!

He too has ridden for Levi and Alberto, and for Lance, Paulo, Carlos, Fabian and George. So get off your high horse and ride your bike!
Thomas Sulentic,
Iowa City, Iowa

(Yet Another) Editor’s Note: Our letters on this subject have been about 50-50 pro-con Horner. However, most of the anti-Horner letters — many of which originated in McCartney’s home state of Iowa — have been more or less unpublishable because of the language and name-calling. Since I didn’t publish any anti-Horner letters last week, I chose these two this week, even though they push the limits of the civility standards we try to maintain in this space.

Armstrong Fatigue
Editors,

Love your magazine and Web site! I’ve been a past subscriber and will probably pick up another subscription soon. I have to be honest about one thing though: please stop giving that Lance Armstrong guy so much coverage.

He did a lot for the sport in North America and his comeback was nothing short of super-human. All this is great but a lot of us are sick of having Lance shoved down our throats on a continual basis. His news is old news and it’s time to move onto bike racers that are relevant to today and the future of our sport.

I think that “Lance” has turned into a commodity and sadly, a cliche’. There are a lot of talented US and Canadian riders that are still in competition and they deserve some space on the written page.

Greg Devins,
Penticton, BC, Canada