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Millar seeks CAS help in riding ’06 Tour

Former world time-trial champion David Millar has asked the Court of Arbitration of Sport in Lausanne to redefine his two-year ban for doping in a manner that allow him to ride in the 2006 Tour de France. Millar, who admitted last June that he had taken EPO, is not appealing the penalty imposed on him, but rather asking that his two-year suspension be calculated from the point at which he made his confession, rather than from the date of his original hearing on the matter. Miller made the confession while in police custody on June 24, 2004. However, despite the fact that the one-time Tour

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Former world time-trial champion David Millar has asked the Court of Arbitration of Sport in Lausanne to redefine his two-year ban for doping in a manner that allow him to ride in the 2006 Tour de France.

Millar, who admitted last June that he had taken EPO, is not appealing the penalty imposed on him, but rather asking that his two-year suspension be calculated from the point at which he made his confession, rather than from the date of his original hearing on the matter.

Miller made the confession while in police custody on June 24, 2004. However, despite the fact that the one-time Tour stage winner stopped competing after that point, a disciplinary panel recommended a two-year suspension from the date of his August 5, 2004, hearing.

Success or failure in the CAS would then determine whether Millar is able to compete again in time for the 2006 Tour de France.

Millar was fired by the Cofidis team soon after his admission. He has since spoken out against drug use in the peloton, saying that his case can and should be used “to explain the dangers of drugs to young riders.”

“I want to show how I got around the system and I’m willing to work with the International Cycling Union and the British Cycling Federation,” Millar wrote on his website. “I think it’s the one thing I can do. I am someone who can give reasons why cyclists should not take drugs. If they ask me to help I will always be there for that.”