Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Medical investigators surveying cyclists on health, injuries

Medical investigators are looking for cyclists to help with an online survey that will provide researchers with detailed information about cycling health and injuries. Researchers from the Injury Prevention Center at Rhode Island Hospital are launching the survey to expand knowledge about cycling-specific injuries and promote safer and healthier cycling.

Don't miss a moment from Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, to the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you join Outside+.

Medical investigators are looking for cyclists to help with an online survey that will provide researchers with detailed information about cycling health and injuries.

Researchers from the Injury Prevention Center at Rhode Island Hospital are launching the survey to expand knowledge about cycling-specific injuries and promote safer and healthier cycling.

“Meaningful data on cycling injuries essentially does not exist,” explained principal investigator Mark Greve, MD. “The largest data sets from groups like the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration lump cycling and pedestrian injuries together. This is an incredible disservice to cyclists since these activities result in very different kinds of injuries.”

The “Cyclist Health and Injury Survey” (http://cyclingstudy.lifespan.org) will create a more complete picture of active cyclists, how often they ride, how their health is affected by cycling and the types of injuries sustained while cycling.

In addition, Greve noted that while there are reams of data on children and helmets, and great information demonstrating the risk of intoxication and bicycle riding, little exists on those who ride their bikes for fitness, fun, competition, commuting or as messengers.

“We hope our study is the first of many that will help improve and promote cycling for health and transportation,” he said.

The results of the online confidential survey will be used to provide feedback to the cycling industry, including the International Olympic Committee, USA Cycling and American Association of Cycling Team Doctors as well as urban planners, cycling engineers and manufacturers.

The survey takes five to 10 minutes to complete. An injury is not a requirement for participants to complete the survey.

Greve is an attending physician and researcher in the Injury Prevention Center at Rhode Island Hospital and clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

He is a member of the American Association of Cycling Team Doctors and a team physician for Team Type 1, a professional road-racing team. His research interests include sports-injury prevention.