Jeanson gets fine and warning for skipping dope test

The United States Anti-Doping Agency announced Monday that a three-member panel of the American Arbitration Association /North American Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) arbitrators has found that Rona’s Geneviève Jeanson committed a doping violation when she failed to appear for a drug test at this year’s Flèche Wallonne World Cup in Belgium. A member of the 2000 Canadian Olympic team, Jeanson received a public warning and was fined 500 Swiss Francs. Jeanson, 22, failed to appear for a doping control test at the request of the Union Cycliste International (UCI) following the race in

By VeloNews Interactive

The United States Anti-Doping Agency announced Monday that a three-member panel of the American Arbitration Association /North American Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) arbitrators has found that Rona’s Geneviève Jeanson committed a doping violation when she failed to appear for a drug test at this year’s Flèche Wallonne World Cup in Belgium. A member of the 2000 Canadian Olympic team, Jeanson received a public warning and was fined 500 Swiss Francs.

Jeanson, 22, failed to appear for a doping control test at the request of the Union Cycliste International (UCI) following the race in Liege, Belgium, on April 21. She was tested by UCI prior to the start of the race, and the results were negative. Her case was adjudicated by USADA because she competes with a racing license issued by USA Cycling, the national governing body for the sport in the United States. Jeanson’s negligence in failing to report is considered a first doping offense according to UCI rules, and results in a sanction. Jeanson has been the subject of controversy since her exclusion from last year’s world championships, after a pre-race blood test indicated that she had an elevated hematocrit level. She was later named by a Quebec doctor as the recipient of illegally procured EPOGEN, a statement he later recanted in a letter to Jeanson’s attorney.

The fallout from both incidents prompted the Quebec cycling federation to request additional documents and medical records from Jeanson before the provincial governing body issued her a license for 2004. Jeanson later filed a request to be licensed in the U.S. since the Canadian spends the bulk of her year training in Arizona.