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Hampsten, Phinney to attend induction into U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame

Andy Hampsten and Davis Phinney, who played major roles in leading modern U.S. professional cyclists racing in Europe during the mid-1980s, will be inducted May 27 into the U.S. Bicycling Hall. The 15th annual awards banquet will be held at the Somerville Elks Club in nearby Bridgewater, N.J. Both athletes plan to attend the ceremony, as do other athlete inductees: Ned Overend and Victor Vincente of America. Phinney won more than 300 races, including two stages of the Tour de France, over his career from 1976 to 1993. He also won a bronze medal at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. Hampsten,

By Peter Nye, VeloNews Correspondent

Hampsten, shown here on the Gavia, a decade after his historic ride up the pass.

Hampsten, shown here on the Gavia, a decade after his historic ride up the pass.

Photo: Coppolillo Media Empire/Used with permission

Andy Hampsten and Davis Phinney, who played major roles in leading modern U.S. professional cyclists racing in Europe during the mid-1980s, will be inducted May 27 into the U.S. Bicycling Hall. The 15th annual awards banquet will be held at the Somerville Elks Club in nearby Bridgewater, N.J. Both athletes plan to attend the ceremony, as do other athlete inductees: Ned Overend and Victor Vincente of America.

Phinney won more than 300 races, including two stages of the Tour de France, over his career from 1976 to 1993. He also won a bronze medal at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. Hampsten, the only U.S. rider to win the Tour of Italy and Tour of Switzerland, raced for 20 years before retiring in 1995. Both Phinney and Hampsten represent Modern Post-1975 Competitors.

Phinney, at his long-time home in Colorado.

Phinney, at his long-time home in Colorado.

Photo: Galen Nathanson

In the Mountain Bike Competitors Category, Ned Overend will be inducted. A successful road racer who switched to the new discipline of mountain bike racing in the 1980s, Overend won the inaugural Union Cycliste Internationale World Mountain Bike Championship in 1990 in Durango, Colorado. He dominated mountain bike racing’s early years and published books as well as videos on the sport.

Another rider known today for his mountain bike racing, Victor Vincente of America, is being inducted in the Modern 1945-1975 Competitor Category. He competed in the 1960 Rome Olympics and 1964 Tokyo Olympics as Michael Hiltner. He also holds the distinction of winning the inaugural national road racing championship in 1965.

Joseph Kopsky (1875-1974) competed in the 1912 Stockholm Olympics U.S. team that won a bronze medal in the 300-kilometer team road race—the last American team to win an Olympic medal until 1984. Kopsky will be inducted in the Veteran Pre-1945 Competitor. He raced professionally in six-day races and later trained many riders, including his daughter, Doris, who won the first women’s national championship in 1937.

In the Contributor Category, Fred DeLong (1915-1995) will be inducted for publishing more than 200 technical articles for trade publications. DeLong, a mechanical engineer, served on the International Standards Organization that set standards on bicycle frame and fork fatigue strength.

Inductions are open to the public, and will feature guest speaker John Eustis, ESPN-TV commentator and two-time USPRO road champion. For call 908/722-3620, or visit the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame.

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