Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Rebecca’s Private Idaho attracts a diverse collection of cycling industry professionals. Cycling journalist Selene Yeager and DNA Cycling team doctor and Asend Nutrition co-owner Ali Flis met before the start. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Rebecca Rusch went over some last-minute ride notes before speaking at the start. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
SRAM mechanic Sara Jarrell made some early morning pre-race adjustments. The temperature at the 8 a.m. race start was in the low 40s. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Rebecca Rusch took a breath before heading to the start of Sunday’s race. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Kaysee Armstrong waited for call-ups before the start. Rebecca’s Private Idaho’s women’s field is greater than 30 percent of the overall registration, according to the organizers. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
The combined fields of the three courses (20, 50, 100 miles) left Ketchum en route to the first climb and first dirt section. Total registration increased 20 percent, according to event organizers. Photo: Cathy Fegan-Kim
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Riders hit dirt roads just a few miles from the start when they began the ascent of Trail Creek Road, the day’s biggest climb. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Riders followed the route of Wildhorse Creek. Photo: Cathy Fegan-Kim
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Crusher in the Tushar event director and founder Burke Swindlehurst got a flat repair from SRAM Neutral Race Support. Much of the course features lots of small rock, although it is not necessarily sharp. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
The riders in the lead group took hand-ups at aid station 3, leaving the food — which included broiled Idaho potatoes with rosemary and sea salt — for the riders who were on a more leisurely schedule. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
2017 Big Potato winner Breanne Nalder high-fived Rebecca Rusch as she passed through an aid station. Photo: Cathy Fegan-Kim
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Riders descended toward Star Hope Creek near the far end of the 100-mile course. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Four-time Paralympic medalist Megan Fisher participated in the three-day Queen’s Stage Race. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Rebecca Rusch passed up riding much of the course in order to spend time with her riders and assist at the aid stations. Photo: Cathy Fegan-Kim
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Professional triathlete Matt Lieto has been showing up — and animating — gravel races such as the Belgian Waffle Ride and, now, Rebecca’s Private Idaho. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
A lack of recent precipitation left riders in a cloud of rock dust for much of the day. Photo: Cathy Fegan-Kim
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Josh Berry, the leader in the stage race, stayed tucked in the middle of the lead group for much of the race. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
The winners’ trophies were custom, locally made license plates. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Post-race, post-podium beer drinking contests kept the crowd in the festival area. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Rebecca Rusch showed perfect catch form in the gelande quaffing event. Her team, however, did not survive the first round of the high-speed beer drinking contest. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Men’s stage race winner Josh Berry (Giant Co-Factory) served up a mug during the post-ride gelande quaffing contest. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Due to the altitude, heat, and arid climate, riders required more than the usual amount of hydration. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
The course is open and features dramatic scenery, but isn’t overly technical or difficult enough to separate riders. The lead dozen riders began the climb of Trail Creek Road together shortly after the start and remained together until around 10 miles from the finish. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
By the time the riders reached Copper Basin, the day’s weather lived up to the promised low 80s. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
For the lead group, the day’s ride resembled more of a road race, albeit with aero bars, especially on the smooth miles of Trail Creek Road. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Winners of each race received custom, locally made western hats. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Men’s stage race overall winner Josh Berry. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Big Potato course winner and women’s stage race winner Kaysee Armstrong. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
All sub-six-hour finishers in the Big Potato receieved custom RPI bollo ties. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Alexa Turzian celebrated her win in the women’s Small Fry race with fellow podium finishers Cherell Jordin and Amanda Porino. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Finishers of RPI were able to travel home with clean bikes, thanks to WD-40 BIKE and the efforts of the local members of the Idaho Interscholastic Cycling League. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Team Scatch & Dent, made up of former combat veterans and paracycling national team riders, hung out post race. Pictured are Mike Durner, Jordan Bressler, Darren Rappaport, Meg Fisher, and Dan Horndasch. Photo: Wil Matthews
Rebecca's Private Idaho 2018
Women’s overall winner Kaysee Armstrong served a beer in the gelande quaffing contest. Photo: Wil Matthews