Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

DeCanio draws suspension, deferment

Matt DeCanio’s admission that he used testosterone and recombinant human erythropoietin (r-EPO) in 2003 brought him a two-year suspension, but thanks to a seven-month deferment he could return to racing in November of this year, the United States Anti-Doping Agency announced Friday in Colorado Springs, Colorado. “In accordance with UCI rules, DeCanio’s two-year suspension began on June 12, 2004, the date of his admission,” the agency said in a press release. “He received a deferment of seven months of the two-year suspension, as permitted by the UCI rules in effect at the time, and is

Don't miss a moment from Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, to the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you join Outside+.

By VeloNews Interactive

Matt DeCanio’s admission that he used testosterone and recombinant human erythropoietin (r-EPO) in 2003 brought him a two-year suspension, but thanks to a seven-month deferment he could return to racing in November of this year, the United States Anti-Doping Agency announced Friday in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

“In accordance with UCI rules, DeCanio’s two-year suspension began on June 12, 2004, the date of his admission,” the agency said in a press release. “He received a deferment of seven months of the two-year suspension, as permitted by the UCI rules in effect at the time, and is eligible to participate in the sport as of November 1, 2005.”

As part of accepting the sanction, DeCanio, 27, of Miami Beach, Florida, also forfeits his results and winnings from the 2003 Housatonic Valley Classic. He voluntarily sat out the 2004 cycling season.

In his online journal, DeCanio wrote that he was given a lesser punishment “to show they (USADA) are willing to work with those who come forward.”

“I really respect everyone at USADA and want to thank them,” DeCanio said.