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Danielson doping case on hold until fall

Closure in Tom Danielson’s doping case won’t come until fall. A three-member arbitration panel has approved a motion to delay that was put forth by Danielson and his legal team. He remains provisionally suspended. According to the U.S. Anti Doping Agency, Danielson’s counsel requested the postponement to allow for further…

Closure in Tom Danielson’s doping case won’t come until fall. A three-member arbitration panel has approved a motion to delay that was put forth by Danielson and his legal team. He remains provisionally suspended.

According to the U.S. Anti Doping Agency, Danielson’s counsel requested the postponement to allow for further analysis of the supplements he was taking at the time of his positive test. His hearing was originally scheduled for June.

“The independent panel will immediately begin the process of setting a new date for the hearing,” the USADA statement said.

Danielson, 38, left the 2015 Tour of Utah on the eve of its first stage and later announced on Twitter that he had tested positive for synthetic testosterone via carbon isotope ratio testing, an exceptionally sensitive testing method. In November, USADA confirmed that Danielson’s B sample was also positive. For more than six months, USADA provided no official updates on his case.

Danielson has denied knowingly taking a banned substance. The stated reason for the postponement — to further test supplements Danielson was taking at the time of his positive test — suggests that Danielson’s defense team will argue that he inadvertently ingested a forbidden substance, possibly through a tainted supplement.

Danielson’s palmares includes a stage win at the Vuelta a Espana and 8th overall at the Tour de France, as well as two overall wins at the Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah.

The positive test last July was his second doping offense with USADA, which banned Danielson for six months in 2012 after he admitted to doping during his time with the Discovery Channel team. That ban was part of USADA’s investigation into Lance Armstrong.

A second offense requires a lifetime ban under the World Anti-Doping Agency’s regulations. Athletes who are able to prove that their positive test came from a tainted supplement often receive reduced bans from USADA.

Danielson was immediately suspended by his Cannondale team following his positive test, and he remains barred from racing by his ongoing provisional suspension. He has founded a coaching and training camp business.