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SRAM launches 2010 mountain goodies

SRAM takes advantage of Sea Otter’s captive audience of domestic and international press every year with a big product launch. This year the brand showed 2010 mountain products from its RockShox, Avid, SRAM and Truvativ lines. Suspension

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By Matt Pacocha

1990 world downhill champ Greg Herbold and RockShox product manager Sander Rigney run through SRAM’s 2010 suspension components.

Photo: Matt Pacocha

SRAM takes advantage of Sea Otter’s captive audience of domestic and international press every year with a big product launch. This year the brand showed 2010 mountain products from its RockShox, Avid, SRAM and Truvativ lines.

Suspension

These days RockShox is dumping more resources into rear shock development than into any other product area, with six engineers working on rear shocks. The biggest development is a Dual Air option on the Monarch line. By offering two adjustable air chambers, positive and negative, the rider has greater control over adjusting the feel of the shock. The Monarch also offers improved small-bump compliance, heavier compression damping for mid-stroke control, and better bottom-out resistance with the Dual Air spring, according to Sander Rigney, SRAM suspension product manager.

While the added control will likely be appreciated, the added valve clearly changes the aesthetic of the shock. The Dual Air spring is available as an option on Monarch models 2.1 through 4.2.

RockShox has taken aim to get more of its shocks spec’ed on manufacturers’ bikes with its revamped Ario shock line. The target for Ario is mid-range performance, or bikes in the $1,000 to $3,000 price range. At the most economical point in the line, the Ario 1.1 goes for Monarch-like feel and performance without the bells and whistles; Ario forgoes sag gradients on its shaft or a swivel-type air valve. The Ario 3.2 sits at the top of the line and features adjustable rebound and a on/off lockout switch, which is offered in both a shock-mounted lever and a handlebar remote. Ario 2.1 offers rebound adjustability and air pressure adjustment, while 1.1 only offers air-pressure adjustability.

At the front end of the bike, a completely redesigned Revelation spans the range from 130mm to 150mm of travel in a lightweight package. This line is made for lightweight trail bikes. Revelation has two damper choices, Motion Control and BlackBox Motion Control, as well as fixed travel and U-Turn options, plus the choice of QR or thru-axle (Maxle-Lite) and steerer tubes in 1.125-inch, tapered and 1.5-inch. Prices range from $509 to $773.

Brakes

Juicy died at Sea Otter. Put another way, the Juicy brakes will be replaced with two new Elixir brakes going forward. The new Elixir CR Mag replaces Juicy Ultimate. Elixir CR Mag is light and compact, with features like TaperBore, no-tool pad contact adjustment and adjustable banjo on the caliper. Key attributes include a forged magnesium lever, a large diameter pivot and a U-Clamp bar mount. The large pivot makes the lever more stable and the no-tool contact adjust is a welcome improvement.

The brake weighs 330 grams (10-15 grams lighter than Ultimate). Rotors will be available in 160mm, 185mm and 203mm. With a 160mm rotor, the Elixir CR Mag costs $285 per wheel.

Also new at Avid are Center Lock specific rotors, in 160mm and 185mm sizes as well as the Elixir 5, which replaces the Juicy 5. The Elixir 5 has a new caliper and lever but features TaperBore and is said to offer a similar ride feel to the 2009 Elixir R.

A rainbow of colors

For 2010, SRAM is selling many of its components in a slew of colors. The X.0 shifters, X.0 rear derailleur, PC990 cassette and the Noir 3.3 crankset will be available to the public in five different colors, with SRAM-sponsored racers offered even more options still.

Technically the Noir crankset is the only component to be refined, via a secondary machining of the inside of the crank’s bottom bracket spindle to shave 14 grams from the crank.

On the Truvativ side, Stylo stems were redesigned and new Noir level carbon seatposts were introduced. There are two seatposts, the World Cup and Team, with 25mm and 0mm offsets.

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