Gear

Jeremy Powers’ Cannondale

At first glance, Jeremy Powers' Cannondale looks like a fairly standard pro mount: a Cannondale aluminum frame with Mavic wheels and SRAM Red parts.

Powers' bike: This is Powers' second year with the Cyclocrossworld.com team. In 2007 he rode a Ridley.

Powers’ bike: This is Powers’ second year with the Cyclocrossworld.com team. In 2007 he rode a Ridley.

Photo: Brad Kaminski

At first glance, Jeremy Powers’ Cannondale looks like a fairly standard pro mount: a Cannondale aluminum frame with Mavic wheels and SRAM Red parts. Closer examination reveals a few interesting aspects because of Powers’ preferences and those of his sponsor and mechanic, Cyclocrossworld.com’s Stu Thorne.

The most noticeable are the yellow magnesium TRP Euro-X brakes. The custom team color and black hardware are, so far, only available to the team. The brake pad posts feature a toe-in design that Thorne developed.

Powers' bike: The yellow brakes with black hardware are a team exclusive.

Powers’ bike: The yellow brakes with black hardware are a team exclusive.

Photo: Brad Kaminski

Powers’ bike also has a prototype SRAM chain with a few painted links so that mechanics can tell it apart from other SRAM chains in the fleet. SRAM is experimenting with a chain intended to be stronger and quieter than the current version. Although the chain would primarily be used on the road, the tough cyclocross conditions are a great testing ground.

Powers' bike: The paint is to help the team tell the prototype chain apart from others.

Powers’ bike: The paint is to help the team tell the prototype chain apart from others.

Photo: Brad Kaminski

Powers' bike: The rear derailleur cable sheath extends from the front housing stop to the chainstay stop.

Powers’ bike: The rear derailleur cable sheath extends from the front housing stop to the chainstay stop.

Photo: Brad Kaminski

The bike has some new Gore Ride-On shifter cables that Thorne is experimenting with. Unlike regular Ride-On cables, these do not have a sealed system from end to end. Instead, the Teflon-coated cable runs through standard housing from the shift lever to the end of the front housing. Then, the cable is sheathed from the headtube housing stop through to the chainstay housing stop. Rubber noodles seal the ends where the sheath starts and begins. Thorne said the cables have been on Powers’ bike with no problem since before the New Jersey USGP races, meaning they survived several very muddy and wet races without needing replacement.

Because Powers prefers a low handlebar position with no headset spacers, Thorne used an old brass cable elbow from a Control Tech stem to handle the sharp angle.

Incidentally, Thorne said Powers’ bike is about a half pound lighter than teammate Tim Johnson’s mount. That’s because Johnson uses Shimano pedals and TRP CR950 carbon brakes.

Frame: Cannondale CX9
Fork: Easton EC90X
Wheels: Mavic Cosmic carbon tubular
Tires: Dugast Typhoon
Shifters: SRAM Red
Rear derailleur: SRAM Red
Front derailleur: SRAM Red
Brakes: TRP magnesium Euro-X yellow
Brake pads: Swiss Stop
Cables: Derailleur cables are prototype Gore-Tex Ride-On
Chain: Prototype SRAM
Crank: SRAM Red, 39×46-tooth rings.
Headset: Cannondale hidden
Seatpost: Control Tech carbon
Saddle: Fizik Aliante
Stem: Control Tech scandium
Handlebar tape: Fizik
Handlebar: Control Tech
Pedals: Crank Brothers Candy 4-Ti, custom team edition yellow.
Cassette: SRAM (not Red), 12×26

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