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Braking News

Seems like the whole staff from Avid (including the company's outspoken tech-savvy president Wayne Lumpkin) stopped by the office just a short time ago to go over the details of its anticipated Juicy 7 hydraulic disc brake. While still not 100 percent production ready (we're expecting the first production set in two weeks) Lumpkin wanted to make darn-sure we were fully up-to-speed on the details of the brake's design and features. Most importantly, Lumpkin went over the motivation behind and the use of the pad contact point adjustment dial. First off, Lumpkin was clear to point out that

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The latest in hydraulic disc brake technology

By Andrew Juskaitis

Avid's eagerly anticipated Juicy 7 hydraulic disc

Avid’s eagerly anticipated Juicy 7 hydraulic disc

Photo: Courtesy Avid

Seems like the whole staff from Avid (including the company’s outspoken tech-savvy president Wayne Lumpkin) stopped by the office just a short time ago to go over the details of its anticipated Juicy 7 hydraulic disc brake. While still not 100 percent production ready (we’re expecting the first production set in two weeks) Lumpkin wanted to make darn-sure we were fully up-to-speed on the details of the brake’s design and features.

Most importantly, Lumpkin went over the motivation behind and the use of the pad contact point adjustment dial. First off, Lumpkin was clear to point out that the dial, “does not in any way move the pads in or out, but instead changes the point at which the lever begins to actuate the hydraulics. This is important to understand because the Juicy 7 is the first brake to offer this type of adjustment. Other brakes offer pad wear compensation, but no brake allows the rider to adjust the actuation point of the brake–especially on-the-fly.”

The very-adjustable lever

The very-adjustable lever

Photo:

Lumpkin was quick to point out that the second most notable feature (actually, Wayne is a fervent believer that every feature on his new brake is significant, but I’ll save you the time by just sticking to the top two features) are the Juicy 7’s lever pull ergonomics.

“We’ve positioned our hydraulic lever’s pivot far closer to the handlebar, which creates the only truly ergonomic hydraulic lever path in the industry,” he said. “It feels better and provides greater power, all with less effort too.”

Some other stats
The brakes will use DOT 4 or 5.1 brake fluid
Three rotor options:  160mm, 185mm or 203mm
Should weigh about 400 grams per wheel (caliper, rotor, hardware andlever)
Will cost (per wheel): $250 for 160mm, $259 for 185mm, $264 for 203mm
Pads are identical to Avid’s BBDB (mechanical brake)

Look for a first detailed look later in VeloNews as we are slated to receive the first production set of brakes.

Speaking of brakes
Two new hydraulic disc brake products showed just as the boys from Avid were saying their good-byes. Needless to say, they prolonged their visit a few extra minutes to peruse the latest offerings from Galfer USA and Goodridge (both highly respected automobile and motorcycle aftermarket brake pad/rotor manufacturers).

Galfer USA (Galfer is a Spanish-based company) sent a pair of its 160mm “wavy” rotors and special-compound Deore-XT replacement brake pads. And while you’ve seen plenty of wavy rotors around, Galfer USA representative Andy Schwartz was clear to point out that Galfer USA holds the patent on the wavy design. www.galferusa.com

Goodridge braided brake lines

Goodridge braided brake lines

Photo: Andrew Juskaitis

Furthermore, Goodridge sent us a pair of its beautiful braided hydraulic disc brake lines. Although we don’t have any pricing details just yet, the lines are designed to provide better protection from heavy impact and provide better “feel” under heavy braking through their lack of expansion. Unique fittings allow for quick and easy removal of the brake lines without having to reinstall a new olive sleeve. Check out Check out www.goodridge.net for more info.

Single Speed Alert!
Allowed only one single speed update per year, I thought I’d make this one count. While scouting at Big Bear, I noticed two Haro employees (Mike Varley and Jill Hamilton) racing on board an interesting single speed design. After the race I was able to corner Varley to see if I could coerce any information regarding the clean looking frame he had just raced. According to Varley the Haro Werks SS uses a Bushnell, internally wedged eccentric to provide adjustment for chain tension on the vertical dropout frame. Varley also noted that, “The eccentric can also be used to alter the bb height. Stick the bb up at the top and it’s got East Coast root clearance. Drop it down and it’s a So Cal fire road gravity machine.” The double butted cromoly steel frame should retail for about $500, weight about 4.1 pounds and will come in XS, Small, Medium and Large sizes.

Enter the Wayback Machine
Finally, just got in the latest tasty sample from PowerBar. Its new energy bar uses a “new” Striped technology to combine Raspberry & Cream into a single bar providing the “best of both flavors.”

Now, I’m not normally one to poo-poo a new idea, but I’m sure more than one of you also might recognize this technology as not being all that new. Ever savored the luscious swirl of flavors present in Fruit Stripe gum?

...oh, that's right!

…oh, that’s right!

Photo: Andrew Juskaitis

Not sure about when that tasty idea first hit the streets, but I can promise you it was light-years before PowerBar came out with its own Striped “technology.” Regardless, the new PowerBar is tasty (like berry flavored oatmeal in a bar) and will cost $1.69. Fruit Stripe gum is available for $.35 at most vending machines.

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