Gear

BH G7 Disc Ultegra

The BH G7 Disc is a bike for riders who value comfort over raw speed but who still want the wind-cheating benefits of an aero bike. It has the aggressive geometry (150-millimeter head tube and 73-degree head tube angle) and a beefy BB386 bottom bracket that you’d expect from a…

Size Reviewed

M

Price

$4,800

Brand

BH


The BH G7 Disc is a bike for riders who value comfort over raw speed but who still want the wind-cheating benefits of an aero bike. It has the aggressive geometry (150-millimeter head tube and 73-degree head tube angle) and a beefy BB386 bottom bracket that you’d expect from a race bike, and the G7 scored impressively well in our lab stiffness tests, especially at the BB with just 0.23mm of deflection.

While this responsiveness was felt on the road with each hard pedal stroke, the slightly bowed seat stays help reduce road vibrations, making for a ride so smooth you might confuse the G7 for an endurance bike. Thru-axles and flat-mount disc brakes also seem incongruous, since discs are still a rarity on aero bikes. But testers loved the smooth, consistent braking of the discs especially when blazing down the steep descents scattered throughout our test loops. The discs also help with the bike’s aerodynamics as BH engineers were able to optimize the geometry of the rear triangle to shed air faster — because they didn’t have to work around a rear brake mount between the seat stays — creating smoother airflow over the back of the bike.

While the G7 performs exceptionally well on the flats, cutting through wind with excellent aerodynamics, it’s no slouch on twisty descents either. Short, asymmetrical (402mm) chainstays make for snappy handing in these tight turns and the bike’s sloping geometry lowers its center of gravity for added confidence in the corners.

The only real disappointment with the G7 was the DT Swiss R23 Spline C disc wheels. One tester noticed severe flex in the rims when pressing hard on the handlebars or climbing out of the saddle. Upgrading to a snappier set of Zipps or Enves would be our first move but the wheels are certainly not a deal-breaker, especially with its reasonable (compared to similar aero road bikes) price tag of $4,800.

Component Highlights: Shimano Ultegra drivetrain with 52/36 crankset and 11-28 cassette; Shimano RS805 hydraulic flat-mount disc brakes; DT Swiss R23 Spline C disc wheels