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Apparel & Accessories

Biehler Women’s Technical Kit review

Capable kit for training rides in moderate to hot and humid conditions.

Basics

Interesting prints on technical fabrics with unique bib design touches that makes them smart to use and wear, delivered via DHL CO2 Green for a demonstrable commitment to protecting the environment.


Pros

excellent modern cut on the jersey;
welcome reflective and utility accents and technical fabrics

Cons

Odd bib strap placement and a finicky locking zipper on the jersey


Our Thoughts

Solid modern jersey for hot conditions and bibs that are perfect for long training days.


Size Reviewed

XS,S

Price

$458

Brand

Biehler


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Biehler is a family-run brand, started in 1993, and their 25-plus years producing cycling kit shows in the thoughtful design of their pieces. Even if there are a couple of odd choices for higher-end cycling kit, their Technical line designed for hot, humid rides uses excellent materials and cuts over smart prints that live up to its name.

Also read: Review — Giordana NX-G Air Jersey and Bibs make for a great summer kit

The Biehler Technical jersey ($177) might be my absolute favorite jersey cut (size extra-small). It has a definitive modern race fit: it keeps the front rise and drop tail, but the torso is overall shorter than many other or older styles of race cut cyling kit. The sleeves are long and tight, coming almost to the elbow – Biehler claims they’re wind-tunnel tested, and they certainly feel like it. The jersey has three rear pockets — no zipper pocket — and the two side pockets are slightly angled at the top, which adds to the lightweight race feel.

The tops of the pockets on the rear sides of the Biehler Technical jersey are angled.
The tops of the pockets on the rear sides of the Biehler Technical jersey are angled. (Photo: Aliya Barnwell)

The company plays with galaxy and splatter prints that hide sweat very well, and the 95 percent micro-polyester and 5 percent elastane blend stretches nicely over the body. Despite being designed for the heat, I didn’t feel cold riding with the Technical kit and a base layer in 60-degree weather. The tag is sewn flat into the lower back, which is the most comfortable way to handle it in my opinion, and it has some encouraging words for you to find as you check the instructions on how to wash your new kit. The result is a jersey that feels like a bespoke, second skin and hides the inevitable sweat lines that form after a long hot ride.

Though nearly perfect, one downside to the jersey is the zipper. The zipper locks by laying the pull flat, but if you forget or you brush the pull upward, the zipper will pull open. It is very light; I’ll give it that. Some people may love the locking zipper feature, and it’s a minor issue in what is, overall, a fantastic jersey.

A similar thing could be said of the sleeves: While I love how aero they are, the banding that keeps them firmly in place around the forearm might be annoying for anyone with biceps.

The Biehler Technical jersey has long sleeves with a compressive band.
The Biehler Technical jersey has long sleeves with a compressive band. (Photo: Aliya Barnwell)

The matching Technical bibs ($281) have their own weird issue: The bib straps are positioned too far to the center of the chest for my particular taste. I’m a member of the itty-bitty-titty committee, and I still find the straps a little uncomfortable when I initially put them on, so I can’t imagine how people with bigger chests might feel.

The straps on the Biehler Technical bib shorts are narrow.
The straps on the Biehler Technical bib shorts are narrow. (Photo: Aliya Barnwell)

Once the straps are situated, however, the bibs (size small) are extremely comfortable. They have large reflective branding on each broad leg band, and the technical fabric doesn’t seem to hold heat despite being dyed black. The chamois did its job, and I wouldn’t hesitate to choose these bibs for centuries with real bathroom stops.

Since the bibs have a traditional racerback getting them off in a Porto-potty — or even worse, in the bushes – requires taking off my jersey, so I prefer to use traditional bibs on rides that have access to real bathrooms to make this process easier. Also, I should mention the bottom of the leg bands already look a bit haggard, which is surprising in bibs that are such high quality in every other way.

On the upside, both the jersey and the bib have sewn-in fabric loops for hanging, so it’s easy to hang the jersey on the bathroom stall door or to hang either item to dry. Thoughtful little touches like these, and the substantial gripper around the bottom of the short-torsoed jersey keep it from riding up, add to the overall functionality of the Biehler Technical kit.

The substantial Biehler gripper around the bottom of the short-torsoed jersey to keep it from riding up, and add to the overall functionality.
The substantial Biehler gripper around the bottom of the short-torsoed jersey keep it from riding up, and add to the overall functionality. (Photo: Aliya Barnwell)

Despite the slight leg fray, the weirdness of the bib strap placement, and the fiddly jersey zipper (the latter two being things possibly being specific to my body and preferences), I’d still strongly recommend this kit, galaxy print or no, for summer and beyond.