Gear

Amy Dombroski’s new ride

Part way through the ’cross season, Amy Dombroski is switching to Primus Mootry and a new set of sponsors.

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Pint-sized ’cross diva Amy Dombroski is following an interesting path this season. Last year she graduated from the Kona-supported Velo Bella program and moved to the East Coast frame-building artisan, Richard Sachs’ team. Now, close to three quarters of the way through the season and due to equipment disagreements, Dombroski found her way onto a frame from Primus Mootry, the former sponsor of Katie Compton.

“I was really impressed as to how quickly it all came together,” Dombroski said of her new team of self-assembled sponsors. “I made the decision at 4:30 in the afternoon, two weeks ago, and emailed Joe DePaemelaere. Two minutes later he emailed saying he wanted to do it.”

Before signing with Sachs, Dombroski had talked with another team, which DePaemelaere was also talking to. The deal fell through for both racer and builder, but it left a relationship that enabled Dombroski’s mid-season Hail Mary email.

“It’s an opportunity that you can’t really pass up,” DePaemelaere said.[singlepic id=178 w=320 h=240 float=right]

In just a couple of days he pulled together two custom frames, built from 7005 series aluminum with carbon top and down tubes from Edge Composites and a BB30 bottom bracket shell.

“A full (7005 alloy) bike is too stiff for her; she’s had experience on those bikes before, so I knew as soon as she dropped me the email what I was going to do and I had the material to do it,” said DePaemelaere. “And that was throwing the carbon in for the top and down tube.”

The carbon adds compliance to the frame, something that DePaemelaere practiced and perfected when he built frames for Compton.

Dombroski’s Custom Primus Mootry

Frame: Primus Mootry, 7005-alloy with Edge Composites top and down tubes

Fork: Ritchey WCS V2 Carbon Cross

Group: SRAM Force; 170mm BB30 crank; 1090 Red cassette, 11-26 (dry courses), 1070, 11-26 (wet courses); Force shifters with reach adjust at its closest position; Force rear derailleur; 1090 chain; SRAM Professional cable system (rear derailleur); Hudz Soft Grip shifter/brake hood covers; Rotor Q-Ring 42-tooth chainring with K-Edge prototype single ring Cross Chain Catcher and K-Edge ring guard.

Cockpit: FSA K-Force handlebar, 40cm; K-Force seatpost, 0mm offset; OS-99 stem, 90mm; Fi’zi:k Bar:tape

Saddle: Fi’zi:k Antares

Pedals: crankbrothers candy 4ti

Wheelset: Reynolds MV32T

Tires: Challenge Grifo, 32mm

The frames weigh just 2.95 pounds according to DePaemelaere. Considering she barely weighs 100 pounds, this is important. Her complete bikes weigh 15.5 pounds.

“It’s my dream frame,” said Dombroski. “When I was coming up they were always the cool-kid frames to have.”

With the frames in hand, Dombroski leaned on relationships from previous cyclocross seasons as well as those made during her summers of road and mountain bike racing. The success she’s had this year on the cyclocross course has made her a hot prospect and likely helped sway those she contacted.

Dombroski took on Clement Tires as her title sponsor, even though the brand has yet to put a tire up for sale. The Clement brand is now licensed and run by Donn Kellogg, former general manager of Challenge USA, and a strong supporter of cyclocross. Dombroski hopes to have the first Clement tires for the Portland rounds of the USGP and Nationals.

Along with Clement and Primus Mootry, Dombroski’s final headline sponsor is the ’cross clothing maker, Schlamm. The manufacturer makes warm ups and rain gear, which it sells, and custom skinsuits for Dombroski. Schlamm is based in the United Kingdom and co-owned by Simon Burney, the author of Cyclocross Training and Techniques.

In addition to the headlining sponsors, the following provide Dombroski equipment: SRAM, FSA, Reynolds, Fi’zi:k, Lazer, Oakley, crankbrothers and Pearl Izumi.

Dombroski will debut her new bikes and team kit at the USGP round in New Jersey this weekend.

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