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Richard Carapaz has a Di2 shifter inside his shifter at the Giro d’Italia

A Shimano satellite button is positioned inside the hood of his Dura-Ace lever.

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Richard Carapaz is racing a shimmering golden Pinarello Dogma F at the Giro d’Italia, but the new paint job is not the most interesting thing on the 2019 Giro d’Italia champion’s bike. The Ecuadorian climber has a Shimano Di2 satellite shifter positioned inside the hood of his shifter lever.

Often called a ‘sprint shifter,’ Shimano’s satellite shifter is a small button that is wired into the Dura-Ace shift lever. The button can be programmed to move either derailleur in either direction, but typically they are used in a pair, with one satellite on the right used to move the rear derailleur into a harder gear and one satellite on the left used to move the rear derailleur into an easier gear.

Typically the satellite shifters are used on the drops, where riders can keep all their fingers wrapped around the bar and still shift in the furious sprint to the finish line — thus the ‘sprint shifter’ moniker.

Sometimes these satellites are used on the bar tops, for use when climbing or riding cobbles.

Mark Cavendish uses a single satellite shifter on the front of his bar, like a trigger.

Richard Carapaz, however, takes the cake for an arrangement we have never seen — cutting a hole in the rubber cover of the shifter body.