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Gallery: Mark Cavendish’s single-sprint-shifter Specialized Tarmac SL7

Unreleased tubeless tires, an older generation power meter, and a single sprint shifter.

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Like a number of sprinters, Mark Cavendish appreciates the sprint-shifter concept, so he can change gears mid-sprint while keeping all of his fingers wrapped around the bar. Unlike all the other sprinters’ bikes that I have seen, though, Cavendish only uses a single sprint shifter — the one on the right side of his handlebar drop to move his chain into an increasingly larger gear.

Cavendish’s forward-facing position on the sprint shifter is also fairly unique, as most others will position the trigger facing somewhat inward to be activated by the thumb or a finger. I’ve noted Cavendish’s forward placement since at least 2017.

Cavendish won Milano-Torino Wednesday on his Specialized Tarmac SL7, equipped with unreleased tubeless tires that Specialized isn’t commenting on, and an older Shimano Dura-Ace 9150 power meter on his otherwise new Dura-Ace 9250 group.

James Startt captured the bike photos below at Tirreno-Adriatico, but the bike and equipment set-up is the same as Cavendish used at Milano-Torino.