Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Vuelta a Espana

Vuelta a España stage 6 preview: The first high mountain day set to shake things up

Three categorized climbs including a difficult finish should reshuffle the GC.

Lock Icon

Unlock this article and more benefits with 25% off.

Already have an Outside Account? Sign in

Outside+ Logo

25% Off Outside+.
$4.99/month $3.75/month*

Get the one subscription to fuel all your adventures.


  • Map your next adventure with our premium GPS apps: Gaia GPS Premium and Trailforks Pro.
  • Read unlimited digital content from 15+ brands, including Outside Magazine, Triathlete, Ski, Trail Runner, and VeloNews.
  • Watch 600+ hours of endurance challenges, cycling and skiing action, and travel documentaries.
  • Learn from the pros with expert-led online courses.
Join Outside+

*Outside memberships are billed annually. You may cancel your membership at anytime, but no refunds will be issued for payments already made. Upon cancellation, you will have access to your membership through the end of your paid year. More Details

After a day for the break on Wednesday, things are going to get a lot more serious for the GC contenders on Thursday.

The Vuelta a España peloton will face a daunting day in the mountains during stage 6, with the flat start to the race in the Netherlands and the relatively constrained past two days in the Basque Country yielding to much tougher terrain.

The 181.2 kilometer stage from Bilbao will take in the first-ever stage finish atop the Ascensión al Pico Jano. San Miguel de Aguayo, and should see fireworks.

Things begin humanely enough with an undulating opening hour and a half. A more difficult remainder to the stage begins with the second category Puerto de Alisas (km 77.7), which is 8.7 km in length and has an average gradient of 5.8 percent.

A long mainly flat section acts as a bridge between that and the start of the day’s middle climb, the category one Collada de Brenes (km 145.8). This averages 8.2 percent over 6.8 kilometers but includes pitches of 15 percent, providing a possible platform for attacks prior to the day’s summit finish.

That is followed by the day’s intermediate sprint at Santa Cruz de Iguña but, in all likelihood, the difficulty of the terrain should put the sprinters out of contention for points there. The sprint is in the foothills of the day’s final climb, the Ascensión al Pico Jano. San Miguel de Aguayo, and this will see the overall contenders going head to head on its slopes.

It is 12.6 km in length, averages 6.55 percent and has three stretches of 11 percent or over. That should provide plenty of opportunity for the strongest climbers and, depending on how he is going on the longer climbs, could see Primož Roglič (Jumbo-Visma) return to a red jersey he willingly vacated on Wednesday.

Alternatively one of his main rivals may start to make a big push for the final Vuelta title. Things are still tight in the GC and any one of a number of riders could end the day in the cherished maillot rojo.