Events

University of Colorado’s Thomas wins NCCA road title on home turf

On a blustery spring morning in the Green Mountains near Burlington, Vermont, more than 500 racers representing 60 Division I and II colleges lined up for day two of the 2002 National Collegiate Cycling Association Road Race. Day one saw racers vying for the national criterium titles in the Summit Street Criterium in Burlington. The road race titles on Saturday would be contested nearby in the Mad River Road Race. At the end of a 65-mile day in the saddle most people would fear a 5-kilometer climb with a 20 percent grade stinger to the finish, but both Darby Thomas (University of Colorado)

By Eric Gullickson , VeloNews correspondent

On a blustery spring morning in the Green Mountains near Burlington, Vermont, more than 500 racers representing 60 Division I and II colleges lined up for day two of the 2002 National Collegiate Cycling Association Road Race. Day one saw racers vying for the national criterium titles in the Summit Street Criterium in Burlington. The road race titles on Saturday would be contested nearby in the Mad River Road Race.

At the end of a 65-mile day in the saddle most people would fear a 5-kilometer climb with a 20 percent grade stinger to the finish, but both Darby Thomas (University of Colorado) and Kate Maher (University of California/ Berkeley) loved it. And that’s why they are each newly crowned 2002 National Collegiate Cycling Association Division I Road Race Champions.

“I love this course — I’m from Montpellier (Vermont) and I ride this all the time,” Thomas said after crossing the line alone at the peak of Appalachian Gap to claim the men’s Division I national title.

Matthew Saduckas (University of California/San Diego) crossed the line six seconds back in second, followed hotly by the dynamic Jacques-Maynes brothers, with Ben (University of California/Santa Cruz) finishing third and Andy (University of California/Berkeley) in fourth. Both were less than a minute back.

Kate Maher, who said that the women’s racing had been mostly slow throughout the day, decided she had had enough when the field reached the final climb up Appalachian Gap.

“Everyone pretty much stayed together,” explained Maher about the field as it came in to the base of the final climb. “I think it was a slower pace than we were expecting just because of all the climbs — I think people were intimidated.”

Maher on the other hand loved it. She proved it by dropping the rest of the field to cross the line more than a minute ahead of second place finisher Andrea Dvorak (University of Virginia). “I thought it was one of the best courses I’ve ever done — it’s amazing,” said Maher after the race.

Both the men and women’s Division II races were contested on the same course as the Division I road race. Amanda Lawrence (Yale) had an outstanding day, flying across the line in the lead group of Division I riders. The men’s event was won by Robert King (Colorado College) who bested his closest rival, Tyler Wren (Princeton University) by more than a minute.

The racing continues on Sunday with the 19-mile team time trial.

Results

2002 NATIONAL COLLEGIATE CYCLING ASSOCIATION CHAMPIONSHIPS, Burlington, VT. May 10-12.;;

Men Division I;;
1. Darby Thomas (University of Colorado); 2.Matthew Sadauckas (University of California San Diego); 3. Ben Jacques-Maynes (University of California – Santa Cruz); 4.Andy Jacques-Maynes (University of California – Berkeley); 5. Patrick Sullivan (University of Colorado); 6. Kevin Livingston (Fort Lewis College); 7. Marc Lanoue (Middlebury College); 8. Jonathan Baggett (Georgia Tech); 9. Nathan Dills (University of Colorado): 10. Benjamin Hademan (Penn State);;

Men Division II;;
1. Robert King (Colorado College);2. Tyler Wren (Princeton University); 3. Kyle Wamsley (Millersville University); 4. Kris Hedges (Johns Hopkins University); 5. Andrew Ingles (Johns Hopkins University); 6. Matthew Cooke (American University); 7. Aaron Haubner (University of Kentucky); 8. Robert Giannini (Emory University); 9. Matthew Merrill (Colorado College); 10. Ari De Wilde (Bates College);;

Women’s Division I;;
1. Kate Maher (University of California – Berkeley); 2. Andrea Dvorak (University of Virginia); 3. Katherine King (University of Colorado); 4. Carolyn Donnelly (University of New Mexico); 5. Zoe Owers (Middlebury College); 6. Anya Hinkle (University of California – Berkeley); 7. Jenna Loyd (University of California – Berkeley); 8. Emily Kachorek (University of California – Davis); 9. Ivana Miucic (Midwestern State University); 10. Margaret Shirley (University of Georgia);;

Women’s Division II;;
1. Amanda Lawrence (Yale University); 2. Stevie Roark (University of Montana); 3. Heather Edwards (St. Louis University); 4. Marissa Kellogg (Yale University); 5. Katherine Sherwin (Northwestern University); 6. Cloe Shelton (Dartmouth College); 7. Amy Wallace (Dartmouth College); 8. Mary Rudy (U.S. Air Force Academy); 9. Kate Strange (Brown University); 10. Lauren Gaffney (Vanderbilt University);;