Tour de France 2020

Armstrong’s long and winding road to Tour

Jet lag is a word that obviously isn’t part of Lance Armstrong’s vocabulary. While Europe has been gripped by its worst winter in decades, Armstrong’s road to the Tour de France this year has been full of sunny climes that would turn any jet-setting royal blue with envy.

Jet lag is a phrase that obviously isn’t part of Lance Armstrong’s vocabulary.

While Europe has been gripped by its worst winter in decades, Armstrong’s road to the Tour de France this year has been full of sunny climes that would turn any jet-setting royal blue with envy.

In January, Armstrong raced in the Tour Down Under for his season debut in the heat of Australian summer. In February, instead of suffering through the European cold, he found refuge in tropical Hawaii.

Just hours after finishing seventh overall at the Tour of Murcia in Spain in his European season debut, the seven-time Tour winner flew Monday to South Africa to compete in the 65-mile Cape Argus race.

“Out for a gorgeous ride here in Cape Town,” Armstrong said on his Twitter feed. “A nice 3hr ride. I’ve heard many times before that Cape Town is stunning. That was no lie. What a place.”

He’ll fly back to Europe next week in time for Milan-San Remo on March 20 and then race on Corsica for the Critérium International on March 27-28.

In April, he’ll be busy in Europe, with likely starts in four big classics: Tour of Flanders, Amstel Gold Race, Flèche Wallonne and Liège-Bastogne-Liège.

After watching him race in Murcia, RadioShack team boss Johan Bruyneel is considering adding the Circuit de la Sarthe (April 6-9) for a few more days of race-speed training.

In May, Armstrong will compete in the Tour of California (in much better weather than its February date) before returning to Europe to put the final touches on his Tour preparation.

In June, Armstrong will likely race in the Tour de Suisse, though the Dauphiné Libéré is another option.