Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Giro d'Italia

2001 Giro route unveiled

The 84th Giro d’Italia route was announced on November 11, and according to Marco Pantani, the 3572km race between Pescara on the eastern coast and Milan promises to be a “wide-open race.” Indeed, many of the stages of the May 19-June 10 race could favor a climber such as Pantani. The race includes 21 stages, an 8km prologue in Pescara, one rolling 55km time trial in stage 15, a foray into Slovenia, and one rest day before the San Remo-San Remo 17th stage. There are 22 major climbs spread out over 10 of the stages, with the highest being the Colle Fauniera at 2511 meters (8161 feet). Three

Don't miss a moment from Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, to the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you join Outside+.

By Lennard Zinn

2001 Giro route unveiled

2001 Giro route unveiled

Photo:

The 84th Giro d’Italia route was announced on November 11, and according to Marco Pantani, the 3572km race between Pescara on the eastern coast and Milan promises to be a “wide-open race.” Indeed, many of the stages of the May 19-June 10 race could favor a climber such as Pantani.

The race includes 21 stages, an 8km prologue in Pescara, one rolling 55km time trial in stage 15, a foray into Slovenia, and one rest day before the San Remo-San Remo 17th stage. There are 22 major climbs spread out over 10 of the stages, with the highest being the Colle Fauniera at 2511 meters (8161 feet). Three stages have mountaintop finishes: the fourth, finishing at the Santuario Montevergine; the 13th, finishing atop the Passo Pordoi in the Dolomites; and the 18th, finishing at Santa Anna di Vinadio north of San Remo. These three stages promise to be pivotal, particularly the 13th and 18th.

The route presentation included Claudio Chiapucci riding to the stage 4 finish at the Santuario Montevergine on a road covered with fallen leaves. Maurizio Fondriest followed, riding from Montebelluna and over the Rolle, Sella, Pordoi and Fedaia passes, but he ran into deep snow. To get to the memorial to Fausto Coppi on the Pordoi, the former world champion had to wade through more than a meter of snow. Gianni Bugno was the final mountain route presenter, riding the 18th stage. The former world champion gave up riding on the snowy road up the Colle Fauniera and put chains on his car. He rode much of the Santa Anna di Vinadio but ended up sliding back down an icy section on his butt!

2001 Giro d’Italia May 19, Prologue: Pescara (8 km) May 20, Stage 1: Giulianova – Francavilla (197 km) May 21, Stage 2: Fossacesia – Lucera (146 km) May 22, Stage 3: Lucera – Potenza (144 km) May 23, Stage 4: Potenza – Montevergine Mercogliano (172 km) May 24, Stage 5: Avellino – Nettuno (226 km) May 25, Stage 6: Nettuno – Rieti (153 km) May 26, Stage 7: Rieti – Montevarchi (238 km) May 27, Stage 8: Montecatini – Reggio Emilia (179 km) May 28, Stage 9: Reggio Emilio – Rovigo (144 km) May 29, Stage 10: Lido Jesolo – Lubljana (SLO) (198 km) May 30, Stage 11: Bled (SLO) – Gorizia (190 km) May 31, Stage 12: Gradisca – Montebelluna (136 km) June 1, Stage 13: Montebelluna – Passo Pordoi (224 km) June 2, Stage 14: Cavalèse – Arco (163 km) June 3, Stage 15: Sirmione – Salo, TT (55 km) June 4, Stage 16: Erbusco – Parme (131 km) June 5: Rest June 6, Stage 17: Circuit de San Remo (138 km) June 7, Stage 18: Imperia – Sant’Anna di Vinadio (234 km) June 8, Stage 19: Alba – Busto Arsizio (184 km) June 9, Stage 20: Busto – Arona (188 km) June 10, Stage 21: Arona – Milan (124 km)