Events

Americans fall in sprint semis

It was a tough morning for the American sprinters on the final day of racing at track World Cup No. 1 in Monterrey, Mexico. All three of the U.S. riders – Jeff LaBauve, Tanya Lindenmuth and Tammy Thomas – were beaten 2-0 in the best of three semifinal round, meaning bronze is the best they can now hope for. On the men’s side, LaBauve fell to German Rene Wollf, the event’s top qualifier. The Texan will now face Matthias John in Sunday evening’s bronze medal match. John (Germany) was also swept out of the semis, losing two straight to Cuba’s Julio Herrera. “The legs were felling a little

By Jason Sumner, VeloNews Associate Editor

It was a tough morning for the American sprinters on the final day of racing at track World Cup No. 1 in Monterrey, Mexico. All three of the U.S. riders – Jeff LaBauve, Tanya Lindenmuth and Tammy Thomas – were beaten 2-0 in the best of three semifinal round, meaning bronze is the best they can now hope for.

On the men’s side, LaBauve fell to German Rene Wollf, the event’s top qualifier. The Texan will now face Matthias John in Sunday evening’s bronze medal match. John (Germany) was also swept out of the semis, losing two straight to Cuba’s Julio Herrera.

“The legs were felling a little sluggish this morning,” LaBauve said. “It’s a long weekend.”

In the women’s semis, Thomas was taken down by Belarus’ Natalia Markovnichenko, while Lindenmuth fell to Russian Svetlana Grankovskaia, the reigning world sprint champion. The pair of Americans will now face off against each other for the bronze medal.

In the morning’s other action, San Diego resident Josiah Ng (Malaysia) cruised to a win in the 5-8 heat, giving the 22-year-old a fifth place finish in the sprint to go along with the bronze medal he earned in Friday’s keirin.

Racing continues in Mexico Sunday afternoon with the men’s kilo, women’s points race, the Madison and the final rounds of the sprint. Check back later to VeloNews.com more a full report, results and photos.

Race notes:
With just one racing session remaining, the medal count is a dead heat. Four countries – USA, Germany, Great Britain and the Netherlands – are tied with three a piece, and four others – Spain, Switzerland, Belarus and Mexico – all have two. Overall 18 countries have sent riders up the podium steps, with only Great Britain owning more than one gold. They have a pair of golds and a silver.

Four continents, Asia, Europe, South America and North America, have all been represented on the podium, a testament to the truly international flavor here at the World Cup in Mexico.