Training: Page 64

The feed zone – Nutrition Q&A with Monique Ryan

Dear Monique;I just read your article on pre-race eating. I will be racing for thefirst time this July and this is a big concern for me as I am very sensitiveto low fuel levels. I have heard that it is a good idea to eat three hoursbefore a race. Most of the races I know of start around 8:00 a.m. to 8:30a.m. This requires eating at 5:00 a.m., or so. The problems I have withthis are waking up (and feeling rested) and being able to eat any kindof significant amount that early in morning. Even at my normal waking hour,I can’t eat much. Is this really the best way? Are there alternatives orother

The feed zone – Nutrition Q&A with Monique Ryan

Dear Monique;I have heard about the glycemic index and have incorporated it intomy training program. However, I have also recently come across the ideaof a "glycemic load," but have a question concerning it. I was wondering,does the glycemic load of a food double if one consumes twice the amountof that food was used to determine the original glycemic load? Thanks,-- NP  Dear NP;I think that you will be hearing more about glycemic load in the future.Referring to a food simply by it’s glycemic index may seem too simple whenyou look at the big picture of how you portion foods and how they

Ask the Doctor – with Prentice Steffen

Dear Doctor,I am a competitive cyclist who has been experiencing excruciating abdominalpains after my training sessions. The episodes usually occur approximately15-30 minutes after I am finished. The symptoms are severe bloating andunbearable pain that sometimes doubles me over. Usually if I take an anti-gaspill the discomfort is minimal and shorter in duration. What do you thinkthe problem could be and what can I do about? -- HG Dear HG:Exercise-related abdominal pains like you're describing can have severalcauses. Your question is a good one because studies have shown than 30to 40 percent

Ask the Doctor – with Michael Ross

Dear Doc;I was recently diagnosed with pneumonia. I was pretty ill for a several days, including a 102-degree temperature, general aches and pains, a pulse of 80 (versus my normal resting pulse in the high 40's/low 50's) and some nasty stuff to hack up.A few days of antibiotics and a methylprednisolone [steroid]dose-pack have me on the mend.Given my schedule, my usual training session is short but intense. Now, I'm concerned with when and how hard I should resume training. Any advice would be helpful, Doc.Thanks,Hacking up phlegm in CTDear Hacker;In general, when you are sick, you should

The feed zone – Nutrition Q&A with Monique Ryan

Dear Monique;I know it is not great to try to lose weight and train hard right before a major event. However, does this make sense. My weight recently rose to about 10 pounds more than usual (about 15 pounds more than "race weight" for me, 6 feet, 165 lbs.) Exactly one month before running a marathon (on May 18) I put myself on a strict diet and have lost 7 pounds in two weeks.Though this may be fast weight loss, it seems reasonable to me. I am mainly losing, I think, from cutting out the beer, chocolate and pizza I had been eating over the past few months. I am now eating more fruit, more

The feed zone – Nutrition Q&A with Monique Ryan

Eating and drinking properly in the hours before training and racing offer several advantages, from topping off your liver and muscle glycogen levels to minimizing the onset of dehydration. And working out your race-day nutritional strategies in the course of your daily training — what, how much and when to eat — will spare you some unpleasant surprises on the race course. “It is not a good idea to start with too much in the stomach, as it tends to come right back up with a hard effort on the bike,” says U.S. Postal pro Michael Barry. “I generally eat three hours before the start. I try and

The feed zone – Nutrition Q&A with Monique Ryan

Dear Ms. Ryan;With all the controversy regarding nutritional supplements, I am curious as to whether they are really necessary. Is it possible for a highly competitive cyclist (which I am not) to get the required vitamins, etc., in a normal, well-thought-out diet? Or are the demands of training and racing so high that it's just not possible to force down enough food? --GPDear GP;Thanks for your question. Because of the demands of your training and racing, you are able to eat significantly more food than your sedentary counterpart. However, what matters is that the foods you choose are quality

Ask the Doctor – with Dawn Richardson

You’ve probably been there before: Up all night between stages because you have a fresh batch of road rash and it’s throbbing. Every time you roll over in bed, your nasty gooey aching hip sticks to the sheets and wakes you up in pain. Your significant other is grossed out and reminds you that you get to do the laundry for the next few weeks. If you’re a cyclist in a stage race, you probably dread facing the next stage because your body aches like an NFL lineman on Monday morning. You are leaking icky wound goo on your skin suit on the starting line the next morning. Yuck. Wouldn’t it be

The feed zone – Nutrition Q&A with Monique Ryan

Dear Ms. Ryan;I recently had the MedGem test completed and found that my metabolic rate was 1590 kcals a day. I also train with a power meter that measures the number of calories that I burn during a ride. Every Tuesday the club meets for a "hammer and suffer fest." During this 1:45 minute death march, I burn approximately 1600 joules, which equates to roughly 1600 calories. Adding these numbers up, I would need approximately 3200 calories on this day to maintain. Since I spend most of the time above my anaerobic threshold, I suspect that the majority of the calories burned are from sugars