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Tour de France 2023

Tour de France 2023 race news, previews, results, tour map, race tech, analysis, and photos.

Dates: July 1 - July 23
Stages: 21
Rest days: 2
Start: Bilbao, Spain (Basque Country)
Finish: Paris, France

The 2023 Tour de France will take place between July 1-23. The 110th edition of the race starts in Bilbao, Spain before crossing back into France on stage 3. In total there are 21 days of racing, two rest-days, and the final stage in Paris on July 23.

The complete race route for the 2023 Tour de France was unveiled in Paris on October 26 with Mark Cavendish, Tom Pidcock and Tadej Pogačar all in attendance.

Also read: The full 2023 Tour de France race route.

Tour de France 2023 overview

The 2022 Tour de France final podium in Paris. (Photo: Getty Images)

Where does the 2023 Tour de France start: In Bilbao, Spain on July 1.
How long is the 2023 Tour de France? 3,404km
How many sprint stages are in the 2023 Tour de France?
8 flat stages
How many mountain stages are in the 2023 Tour de France: 8 with four summit finishes.
How many time trials are in the 2023 Tour de France: 1 consisting of 22km.

Tour de France 2023 news stories

Tour de France 2023 contenders

Defending champion Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma) has not yet confirmed his participation in the 2023 Tour de France but it's increasingly likely that the Danish rider will be on the startline on July 1. He will go up against two-time Tour de France winner Tadej Pogacar (UAE Team Emirates), who won the race in 2020 and 2021.

EF Education-EasyPost are likely to send new signing Richard Carapaz to the race, while Ineos Grenadiers have options in Tom Pidcock, Dani Martinez, and former winner Egan Bernal. The latter has already hinted that he would like to race the Tour de France in 2023 after returning from injury.

Other riders who are set to be on the start line include Romain Bardet, Simon Yates, David Gaudu, Jai Hindley, and Ben O'Connor. 

Also read: Tour de France Hommes 2023: Analyzing the possible GC contenders

Tour de France 2023 route

The 2023 Tour de France features four summit finishes – and a heap of other climbing tests besides – and just a single time trial, which is also an uphill test at Combloux in the northern Alps, where most of the critical mountain action will be focused.

The race contains one 22km time trial from Passy to Combloux, eight stages in the mountains, four of which conclude with summit finishes. The race starts on July 1 in the Basque Country and concludes in Paris on July 23.

The Grand Départ in the Basque Country sets the tone from the start. The two typically beefy stages through the region’s valleys and over its hills will draw the yellow jersey contenders to the forefront of the action. The final day on Spanish soil will herald a change of tempo, the focus switching to the sprinters as the Tour heads into Bayonne in French territory, where it will stay right to the finish in Paris. The sprinters should get another chance to go elbow to elbow the next day on the Nogaro motor-racing circuit near Auch.

Also read: 2023 Tour de France full race route unveiled

Tour de France 2023 sprinters

There are between 7 and 8 stages suited to the sprinters in the 2023 Tour de France. Mark Cavendish is hoping to return to the race after a year's absence as he looks to break Eddy Merckx's record of 34 stage wins.

Jasper Philipsen, Sam Bennett, Caleb Ewan, Fernando Gaviria, Dylan Groenewegan and Fabio Jakobsen, are all likely to take part. Although not a pure sprinter, Wout van Aert is set to race as he looks to defend his crown in the points classification.

Also read: Mark Cavendish eyes ‘ample’ sprint opportunities at Tour de France

Tour de France 2023 route map

Tour de France 2023 route map
Tour de France 2023 route map (Photo: ASO)

Tour de France bikes and tech

Tour de France 2023 stages

1 July – Stage 1: Bilbao – Bilbao (Spain)
2 July – Stage 2: Vitoria-Gasteiz – San Sebastian (Spain)
3 July – Stage 3: Amorebieta-Etxano (Spain) – Bayonne
4 July – Stage 4: Dax – Nogaro
5 July – Stage 5: Pau – Laruns
6 July – Stage 6: Tarbes – Cauterets Cambasque
7 July – Stage 7: Mont-de-Marsan – Bordeaux
8 July – Stage 8: Libourne – Limoges
9 July – Stage 9: Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat- Puy de Dôme
10 July – Rest day 1: Clermont-Ferrand
11 July – Stage 10: Vulcania (St-Ours-les-Roches) – Issoire
12 July – Stage 11: Clermont-Ferrand – Moulins
13 July – Stage 12: Roanne – Chiroubles ou Belleville-en-Beaujolais
14 July – Stage 13: Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne – Grand Colombier
15 July – Stage 14: Annemasse – Morzine
16 July – Stage 15: Les Gets – St-Gervais Mont-Blanc
17 July – Rest day 2: St-Gervais Mont-Blanc
18 July – Stage 16: Passy – Combloux (TT)
19 July – Stage 17: St-Gervais Mont-Blanc – Courchevel
20 July – Stage 18: Moûtiers – Bourg-en-Bresse
21 July – Stage 19: Moirans-en-Montagne – Poligny
22 July – Stage 20: Belfort – Le Markstein
23 July – Stage 21: St-Ouentin-en-Yvelines – Paris Champs-Élysées

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Latest Tour de France News

16 years ago

End of the road for Phonak

Floyd Landis might be able to keep his Tour de France crown if he wins his doping case in arbitration, but his Phonak team won’t be around next season even if he does. Team owner Andy Rihs announced Tuesday that Phonak will fold at the end of the 2006 season after its new title sponsor pulled out of the deal in the wake of Landis doping scandal.


17 years ago

Names of Operación Puerto riders released

The following riders were named in the ongoing Opera?ion Puerto doping case by Spanish investigators on Thursday: Astaná-WürthMichele Scarponi (I)Marcos Antonio Serrano (Sp)David Etxebarria (Sp)Joseba Beloki (Sp)Angel Vicioso (Sp)Isidro Nozal (Sp)Unai Osa (Sp)Jörg Jaksche (G)Giampaolo Caruso (I) CSCIvan Basso (I) Caisse D'Epargne-Iles BalearesConstantino Zaballa (Sp) Saunier Duval Carlos Zarate (Sp)Ag2r Francisco Mancebo (Sp)


17 years ago

Inside Cycling with John Wilcockson:When LeMond reached the Tour podium

Last week, I left you with a thought from Greg LeMond after Frenchman Laurent Fignon won the 1983 Tour de France: “We all thought it was kind of a fluke.” Had LeMond, then 22, started that Tour, he might well have won it. He was two months older than Fignon, who was his teammate, and LeMond would have gone into the race with much better results, including victories at the 1982 Tour de l’Avenir and 1983 Dauphiné Libéré. Backing up that theory was the manner in which LeMond continued the 1983 season, winning the world championship and then the Super Prestige Pernod title (see “Inside Cycling,”


17 years ago

L’Equipe alleges Armstrong samples show EPO use in 99 Tour

Lance Armstrong has vigorously denied allegations outlined in Tuesday’s edition of the French sports daily L’Equipe charging that the seven-time Tour de France champion used the performance-enhancing drug EPO to help him achieve his first Tour victory in 1999. "Yet again, a European newspaper has reported that I have tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs," Armstrong said in a statement on www.lancearmstrong.com.


18 years ago

Weening: Flying Dutchman with a future

Dutchman Pieter Weening (Rabobank) gave a glimpse of his potential and ended a frustrating streak of runner-up places with a well-taken win on the eighth stage of the Tour de France Saturday in Gerardmer. Weening had to wait an agonizing few minutes before finding out for sure if he had really won a two-man sprint with Germany's Andreas Klöden (T-Mobile) - and when the result came he could still not quite believe it. "In a two-man sprint nothing's decided until it's over so I just tried to hold on for as long as possible," said Weening, who is the first Dutchman to win a stage


18 years ago

Isolated Armstrong tested as Weening wins stage

Lance Armstrong looked around near the summit of the rather anonymous Cat. 2 Col de la Schlucht in the chilly Vosges Mountains and couldn’t find many friendly faces. In the big front group he was with, there were no other Discovery Channel riders. No Chechu, no Triki, no Popo. Not even his 2005 favorite mountain goat, José Azevedo. What the six-time Tour champion did see were lots of riders licking their chops. For the first time in years at the Tour de France, Armstrong was isolated. “It was not a great day. I didn’t feel very good and the other teams did feel good,” said Armstrong, who


21 years ago

Tour de France winners

Roll call of past Tour de France winners:    1903  Maurice Garin (Fra)   1904  Henri Cornet (Fra)   1905  Louis Trousselier (Fra)   1906  Rene Pottier (Fra)   1907  Lucien Petit-Breton (Fra)   1908  Lucien Petit-Breton (Fra)   1909  Francois Faber (Lux)   1910  Octave Lapize (Fra)   1911  Gustave Garrigou (Fra)   1912  Odile Defraye (Bel)   1913  Philippe Thys (Bel)   1914  Philippe Thys (Bel)Stopped due  war     1919  Firmin Lambot (Bel)   1920  Philippe Thys (Bel)   1921  Leon Scieur (Bel)   1922  Firmin Lambot (Bel)   1923  Henri Pelissier (Fra)   1924  Ottavio Bottechia (Ita)   1925 


22 years ago

Postal announces Tour squad

There were no major surprises as the U.S. Postal Service team announced its line-up for the upcoming Tour de France. Joining two-time defending champion Lance Armstrong will be three Americans — Tyler Hamilton, George Hincapie and Christian Vande Velde; Spaniards Roberto Heras and Jose Luis Rubiera; Russian Viatcheslav Ekimov; Norwegian Steffen Kjaergaard; and Colombian Victor Hugo Pena. The full text of the team’s announcement follows: U.S. POSTAL SERVICE PRO CYCLING TEAM TOUR DE FRANCE TEAM ANNOUNCED Choosing from what he called were 10 valid candidates, the United States Postal Service


22 years ago

Lance is No. 1

When Lance Armstrong enters the start house at the prologue of this year’s Tour de France, he’ll not only be the two-time defending champion, but for the first time in his career he will be the UCI’s world No. 1 ranked rider. The UCI issued its latest rankings on Monday, with Armstrong moving into the top spot, ahead of Liquigas’s Davide Rebellin, thanks to Armstrong’s win at the recent Tour of Switzerland. Telekom’s Erik Zabel is third, with Giro d’Italia winner Gilberto Simoni fourth. UCI road rankings(at July 2)1. Lance Armstrong (USA), U.S. Postal Service, 2098pts 2. Davide Rebellin


22 years ago

Dreaming of Yellow

With 1998 winner Marco Pantani uninvited, this 88th Tour de France has the look of a two-horse race, at best. Other than '97 winner and three-time runner-up Jan Ullrich, the rest of defending champion Lance Armstrong's potential rivals look to be too inexperienced, too old - or they're on Armstrong's team! Upsets do happen. But not this year. So here is our assessment of each contender's strengths and weaknesses: 1. Lance Armstrong (USA), 29, U.S. Postal Service plus: The two-time defending champion says: Catch me if you can! His team is stronger than last year, particularly in the


22 years ago

Americans at the Tour

There will be only one American team at the Tour de France this year, Lance Armstrong’s U.S. Postal Service formation. The expected debut by Mercury-Viatel was thwarted in May by the Tour organizers’ jingoistic wild-card choice of two extra Division II French teams, as opposed to a second Division I team from the U.S. Despite that, there could still be as many as nine Americans on the start line in Dunkirk. Here is a quick look at each of them, with a review of their 2001 preparation and prospects. Lance ArmstrongAge: 29Height: 5 ft. 11 in. Weight: 165 lbs.Hometown: Austin, TXTeam: U.S.


22 years ago

The Tour for 2001

One prologue. Twenty stages. Two rest days. 3454 kilometers. The joy of finishing in Paris: Priceless.


22 years ago

Indurain takes Tour to task

At an awards ceremony in Madrid on Saturday, five-time Tour de France winner Miguel Indurain criticized race organizers for not keeping Italian climber Marco Pantani in the 2001 race. Tour de France director Jean-Marie Leblanc a week ago named five wild-card teams, but did not include Pantani's Italian outfit, Mercatone Uno. "As a supporter, it upsets me that such great riders as Pantani are not going to the Tour de France," Indurain said. "The organizers have followed the rules, taking the top 15 teams and invitations are their affair. It all depends on their sponsors. (The organizers)


22 years ago

Back in-form Bartoli confirms for Tour

Italian cyclist Michele Bartoli confirmed on Thursday that he would be taking part in July's Tour de France despite pulling out of the Giro d’Italia, which gets underway May 19. The 30-year-old leader of the Mapei team, who won the Het Volk Classic in March, pulled out of the Giro complaining that he was exhausted and did not want to run the risk of competing before the Tour de France. He also announced that he would be racing in the Tour of Germany from May 29 to June 4, the Tour of Switzerland from June 19-28 and the Italian road race championship on July 1. Copyright AFP 2001


22 years ago

Verbruggen: Tour picks aren’t good for the sport

Union Cycliste International president Hein Verbruggen said Friday that Tour de France organizers have placed parochial interests ahead of the sport in their decision to issue wildcard invites to two Division II French teams and not to the teams of Italy's 1998 champion Marco Pantani and sprint ace Mario Cipollini. Verbruggen, in an interview with the Dutch news agency ANP, said that in the future different measures will be in place as to who was invited to the major Tours if they did not qualify automatically through the world rankings. "The Tour organizers placed chauvinistic and


22 years ago

Tour director stands by decision not to invite Pantani

Tour de France race director Jean-Marie Leblanc ruled out any chance of reversing Wednesday’s decision not to invite Mercatone Uno and their team leader Marco Pantani, Italy’s1998 Tour champion, to this year’s race. Leblanc admitted the choice hadn't been easy, but in the end was unanimous among the electors. "However, we mustn't go back on the decision because that would be admitting we were wrong," LeBlanc said on Thursday. "Anyway, if we made an exception of Mercatone-Uno [Pantani's team] why not then Saeco [the team of ace sprinter Mario Cipollini]?" he added. Defending


22 years ago

Leblanc names five teams to Tour

The Société du Tour de France on Wednesday surprised many by announcing the names of five wild-card teams that will be invited to compete in the 2001 Tour. The announcement brings the total number of participants to 189 riders, representing 21 teams. As expected, the Belgian Lotto-Adecco team topped a list that also includes Denmark’s CSC-World Online, the Basque country team of Euskaltel-Euskadi and two additional French teams, BigMat-Auber 93 and La Française des Jeux. Notably absent from the list are the Mercatone Uno team of 1998 Tour winner Marco Pantani, the Saeco squad of super


22 years ago

Commentary: Leblanc’s wild-card picks devalue the Tour

In selecting two more French teams and excluding Mercatone Uno and Mercury-Viatel, Tour de France director Jean-Marie Leblanc has devalued this year’s 88th Tour. Wednesday morning in Paris, Leblanc announced five wild-card selections — not four as originally scheduled — to create a field of 21, nine-man teams that will contest the race, July 7-29. The “new” teams are BigMat-Auber 93 and La Française des Jeux of France; CSC-World Online of Denmark; Euskaltel-Euskadi of Spain; and Lotto-Adecco of Belgium. “To invite 21 teams is a circumstantial measure,” said Leblanc, in explaining that French


22 years ago

Danish paper claims Tour picks almost certain

A Danish newspaper claims to have the inside line on which teams will be given the four remaining Tour de France spots and Marco Pantani's Mercatone Uno team and the American Mercury squad aren't among them. Copenhagen’s daily Berlingske Tidende reported on Monday that CSC-WorldOnline, the team of France's former world number one Laurent Jalabert, is going to get one of the four wildcard entries to this year's Tour de France. Tour de France director Jean-Marie Leblanc will reveal the names of the four teams on May 2, but the newspaper reported that sources within the Tour


22 years ago

Tour organizers unveil doping strategy

Tour de France organizers unveiled their version of cycling's Ten Commandments in Paris Thursday — a plan of action aimed at stamping out doping in the peloton this year and setting a precedent for the future. The 10-point plan, costing over 10 million francs ($1.4 million) over the next three years, focuses on banning riders who are caught doping from the start of the race, maintaining vigilance throughout the three-week event, and promoting "clean" sports practices in the future. The measures are aimed at assuring the skeptical, and preventing a fiasco similar to that which nearly


22 years ago

Tour VTT back from the grave?

France's Tour VTT -- the granddaddy of mountain bike stage races -- may be reincarnated next season. The race, which first ran in 1994 and folded after the 1997 event, is organized by the Société du Tour de France; the company is looking at reviving the event in August of 2002, according to comments made on March 8. "There has been a kind of frustration on behalf of mountain bike enthusiasts," declared Jean-François Pescheux, sporting director of the Société. One option being studied is to open the event to the general public, rather than restricting it to elite riders, as was done in


22 years ago

U.S. Postal hands over Tour samples for testing

Citing notification from the sport's international governing body, officials with the U.S. Postal Service team have given their approval for testing of all riders' blood samples that were gathered during last year's Tour de France. According to a team press release on January 31, the request was made on January 30 by the Union Cycliste Internationale after that organization was contacted by French authorities with a request to turn over the samples. The team has given its approval, and also requested that "an independent expert of our own choosing" be allowed to assist in the


22 years ago

Telekom’s $10 million assault on the TDF

Team Telekom announced that it is throwing its biggest-ever budget at an assault on the Tour de France, won four years ago by its rider Jan Ullrich. Ullrich told journalists at the team's 2001 season launch, held in Bonn on January 29, that he was hungry for another yellow jersey, and said he was in the sort of shape to challenge reigning champion Lance Armstrong. "Every year that I don't win the Tour is a lost year," said the 27-year-old from Rostock in the former East Germany. "It's been a long time since I've been in such good shape and whatever happens I want to


22 years ago

2001 TDF teams announced

The U.S. Postal Service is one of 16 teams that now have an official slot in the 2001 Tour de France, according to an announcement from the Société du Tour de France at a press conference in Paris, on January 23. Look for additional information later today on VeloNews.com. The teams announced today include: Germany: Telekom Belgium: Domo-Farm Frites Spain: IBanesto.com, Kelme, ONCE United States: US Postal France: AG2R, Bonjour, Cofidis, Crédit Agricole, Festina, Jean Delatour Italy: Fassa Bortolo, Lampre, Mapei Netherlands: Rabobank Four additional teams will be included for the


22 years ago

Tour organizers drop bombshell in team selections

The line-up for this year's Tour might be a little thin when it kicks off in Dunkirk on July 7. By favoring three French Division 2 squads in its 16 pre-selections for the 2001 Tour de France on Tuesday, the race organizers left out the teams of Marco Pantani (Mercatone Uno-Albacom), Alex Zülle and Fernando Escartin (Team Coast), Laurent Jalabert (CSC-World Online), Pavel Tonkov and Chann McRae (Mercury-Viatel), Mario Cipollini and Laurent Dufaux (Saeco), Jeroen Blijlevens (Lotto-Adecco), David Etxebarria and Haimar Zubeldia (Euskaltel-Euskadi), and Christophe Mengin (La Française des


22 years ago

No more stuffed lions after 2003?

The French bank Crédit Lyonnais, a sponsor of the Tour de France for 20 years, will have the option of not renewing it's contract with the Tour after the 2003 race, although the bank won't make a decision until after the 2001 Tour according to Nicolas Chaine, the bank's director of communications. In 1994 Jean Peyrelevade took over as head of the struggling bank and decided to renew the contract with the Tour for another eight years, despite an annual cost of 35 million francs, in order to keep the company from appearing "truly moribund." The company has stuck with the Tour,


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Tour de France Writers

Andrew Hood

Andrew Hood, aka “EuroHoody,” is the VeloNews European editor. Since joining VeloNews in 2002, he’s been chasing bike races all over the world.

Betsy Welch

Betsy is a senior editor at VeloNews. Before that, she was a Spanish teacher and most recently, a Registered Nurse working in community health. She’s been freelancing about bikes and other outdoors and health-related topics for over a decade. When she’s not riding or writing, Betsy adores traveling. In 2016, she started, and will one day finish, bikepacking the length of the Baja Divide.

Sadhbh O'Shea

Based in the cycling haven of the Isle of Man, Sadhbh O’Shea has been writing about cycling for almost 10 years. She has covered too many bike races to count, including all three grand tours and a whole host of monuments.

Jim Cotton

Jim is a UK-based editor and reporter. With experience on the ground at the Giro d’Italia, Paris-Roubaix, Strade Bianche, road worlds, UAE Tour and many others, Jim has worked some of the biggest races in the world. Like any aspirational WorldTour rookie, he knows that a Tour de France debut is around the corner. Jim covers a lot of race reports while also focussing on deep dives into the dynamics, personalities and training at the top of the sport. And where are many of those story ideas dreamed up? While out training for trail running races – but don’t hold that against him.

Daniel Benson

Daniel Benson is the Editor in Chief at VeloNews.com. Before that, he was the EIC at Cyclingnews between 2008 and 2022. Originally from Ireland but based in the UK, he has reported from over a dozen editions of the Tour de France, several world championships across Europe, three editions of the Tour Down Under, the Spring Classics, the London 2012 Olympic Games, and numerous other major cycling events. Daniel plans the global race and news coverage for VeloNews and works alongside the rest of the excellent editorial team in ensuring that the site’s reporting delivers to its loyal and respected readership. Rides: Pinarello, Cinelli, and Cannondale.

Dan Martin

Dan Martin was one of the most successful riders of his generation with the Irishman winning stages in all three grand tours, and finishing inside the top-ten in all of them too. Also a winner of Liege-Bastogne-Liege and Il Lombardia, he was a consistent winner throughout his career. Having retired at the end of 2021, Martin has started a number of new projects, including regular contributions for.

How to watch the Tour de France in 2023

For 2023: GCN+ is showing the Tour de France in North America. Those of you in Europe have more options.

Inside the United States and Canada

Cycling fans in the U.S.A. and Canada can watch the Tour de France streamed through GCN+. The $49 annual subscription will allow you to watch via a web browser, the mobile app, or a smart tv app.

Daily coverage begins as early as 5:00 a.m. EDT daily. You’ll want to check the specific broadcast time for each stage, since there is some variability in the start times of the daily broadcast.

Outside the United States and Canada

GCN+ will show the race in Europe, Australia, and the United Kingdom. Eurosport will show the race in Europe. Other options include Rai Sport in Italy, L'Equipe TV in France, and Sporza in Belgium.