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Annemiek van Vleuten: ‘I wasn’t interested in Rio revenge at Tokyo Olympics’

Annemiek van Vleuten's season highlight was winning gold at in the TT at the Tokyo Olympics, but she didn't see it as closure or revenge after her Rio crash.


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Technical FAQ: Even more tubeless tire mounting tips


Have a question for Lennard? Please email him at veloqna@comcast.net to be included in Technical FAQ.

Dear Lennard,
With respect to your most recent tech article about tubeless tire struggles, I have a few comments. I first started dealing with tubeless when I bought my first gravel bike a few years ago and immediately had serious issues with tubeless tires when I tried to change the stock tires. I have smaller hands and not a lot of hand strength and would literally spend hours trying to change one tire. After a lot of reading and asking for suggestions on my favorite gravel site, things have improved such that I can typically change a pair of tires in less than an hour. The key for me has been the generous use of soapy water on both sides of the tire. Additionally, once I have most of the second side of a tire under the rim, I go around the tire and make sure it is sitting as low in the rim bed as possible to minimize the bead tension.

Lastly, in your article you emphasize ending at the valve; I assume that is related to a tube being in the tire and makes no difference with tubeless?
— Scott

Dear Scott,
Ending at the valve IS JUST AS IMPORTANT WITH A TUBELESS TIRE AS WITH A TUBED TIRE! It’s critical. Sorry I didn’t clarify why you do it last week.

You should finish at the valve because if you instead finish at the other side of the rim, the valve is preventing the beads on the opposite side of the tire from dropping into the rim valley. That maximizes the rim diameter you are trying the stretch the tire over. So, by NOT finishing at the valve stem, you are making it as hard as you possibly can!
― Lennard

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