Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Greg Van Avermaet rolls to the starting line of stage 1 of the 2019 Tour de France aboard his Giant TCR with custom gold paint. By the end of the day, GVA would swap his orange CCC jersey for the polka dot jersey. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Van Avermaet’s Giant TCR gets custom gold paint, but perhaps more notably, it’s dressed up in brand new Cadex components. While he’s likely to run these Cadex 42 wheels during the Tour, he started stage one on the deeper-profile Cadex 65 wheels. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
The TCR is decked out with Shimano’s Dura-Ace Di2 drivetrain. The Di2 wiring enters the frame at the top tube. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Some custom graphics on the down tube celebrate some of Van Avermaet’s finest moments in cycling. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Can you guess what each graphic indicates? Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Battle scars. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Like many pro riders, Van Avermaet rides a frame that’s slightly small for him to capitalize on increased frame stiffness. Hence, he runs a fairly long stem to compensate. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Wispy Giant bottle cages keep things light. But that’s hardly necessary; team mechanics had difficulty during stage 1 getting the team’s bikes to weigh enough to meat the UCI’s 6.8kg rule. Hence, some bikes featured weights taped to the down tube. Van Avermaet’s was not one of them, but it could explain why he opted for larger wheels during the stage. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Go! Venga! Allez! Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Understated team graphics complement the gossamer seat stays. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Aero isn’t just for aero bikes anymore. Even climbers are getting in the aero game with integrated cockpits, among other wind-slippery features. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
Van Avermaet ran a 53-39 chainring combo and an 11-30 cassette on his training rides before the Tour started. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
The new Cadex Boost saddle is a snub-nose design with carbon rails that extend all the way to the rear of the saddle to create a “hammock” effect, as Cadex representatives put it. That should up the compliance and stability of the saddle. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Greg Van Avermaet's Giant TCR
The Cadex 42 wheels seem to be a perfect fit on Van Avermaet’s bike; they offer aerodynamic advantages but are light enough to feel right at home on a climbing bike. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com