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Chris Froome wants to join Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault, Jacques Anquetil, and Miguel Indurain as a five-time champion. Geraint Thomas wants to prove that his 2018 victory is a replicable achievement. Peter Sagan has a date with a record-breaking seventh green jersey.

And who can forget we cycling fans? We desire a race that lives up to the dramatic battles from 10, 20, and 30 years ago.

History is on the line at this year’s Tour de France, and we here at VeloNews have continued our unbroken 32-year streak of publishing our annual Tour de France Guide. This year we have created our own distinct Tour de France guide, with all-new design and infographics, and the same world-class photography you’ve come to expect from our team. The stories, which take you inside the storylines shaping the 2019 race, are written entirely by our editors and contributors. We have designed the guide from the ground up, with feature stories, marquee interviews, and information that bring the race—and its compelling history—to life on the pages of VeloNews.

It’s no secret that the 2019 Tour de France marks an important anniversary for three of the most exciting Tours in the history of the race: 1989, 1999, and 2009. In our issue, we feature stories written by the journalists who covered each race: Samuel Abt of The New York Times, Rupert Guinness of The Sydney Morning Herald, and our own Andrew Hood. Their stories show how the media infrastructure at the time shaped our modern understanding of each race. Guinness, for example, had to write newspaper stories proclaiming both Greg LeMond and Laurent Fignon the winner of the 1989 Tour.

This year we have an exclusive interview with defending champion Geraint Thomas, which features his thoughts on the 2019 route and contenders. Thomas takes us inside his 2018 Tour de France victory, which saw him topple his teammate Chris Froome. Thomas also explains how his life off the bicycle has changed in the wake of his victory; he’s now a celebrity in the U.K. and scores courtside tickets to Los Angeles Lakers games. It must be nice.

As always, our essential guide includes profiles and descriptions of all 21 stages of the Tour. Since this Tour boasts the highest overall elevation of any Tour in history, we have created intricately detailed elevation profiles of the race’s most decisive climbs. There is the fearsome summit finish atop the Col du Tourmalet on stage 14, followed four days later by the punishing stage 18, which takes in the Col d’Izoard and Col du Galibier. The race will come to a head on the short 123km stage to Tignes, which crosses the Col de l’Iseran, the highest paved pass in the Alps.

New for 2019 is our Tour de France viewing guide aimed at casual, avid, and hardcore fans of the race. We understand that even the most dedicated cycling fan cannot watch every moment of the Tour. This year we want to join you in your living room to tell you which stages to watch, and which to skip. If you have 10, 20, or 30 hours to give to the Tour this July, our guide will tell you how to distribute your time.

And of course, the Tour guide wouldn’t be complete without detailed profiles of the favorites, and some informed commentary on the three historical questions on the line at this year’s Tour de France. How can anyone stop Froome? How does a sprinter topple Sagan? And, what must the Tour de France do to liven up the action?

All that and much more in our annual VeloNews Tour de France guide.