The battle for plush took center stage at Paris-Roubaix this year.

Within the tech pits at this year’s Paris-Roubaix, we again saw technological innovations and mechanical tinkering aimed at creating a plush ride across the pavĂ©. Team Sky’s new Dogma K-10 stole the show with its new HiRide suspension system, which featured thud-bumping suspension elements in the front fork and atop the rear seat stays. Mechanics said the suspension allowed the squad to opt for narrower 27mm tires, rather than go full plush with 28mm or even 30mm rubber.

Deeper in the pits we saw other innovative tech solutions for shifting and drivetrain maintenance. K-Edge chain catchers abounded, as mechanics tried their best to keep the chains on big rings. Trek-Segafredo again used its 1x SRAM RED eTap AXS big chainrings, with riders opting for a 52-tooth ring up front.

We saw other personal touches in the pits. Sep Vanmarcke and Jens Keukelaire opted for super-stiff integrated stem/handlebars. Matteo Trentin mounted his Shimano Di2 climber switches to the front of his bars. Wout van Aert had an additional brake lever on the tops of his handlebars. John Degenkolb had a photo of his family on his stem. Scroll through the gallery below for a close look at these special bikes.

Paris-Roubaix tech
Sky’s Dogma S10 features the EDSS suspension, which the brand claims controls stiffness automatically. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Another view of the innovative rear suspension. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Luke Rowe’s Pinarello Dogma K10 had the company’s “flex stays” system for more compliance. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Sky ran 27mm tubular tires for a day on the cobbles. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
All Sky riders used chain catchers. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Rowe had all 29 sectors listed on his top tube. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
John Degenkolb carried a photo of his wife and children on his stem. Photo: Fred Dreier
Paris-Roubaix tech
The entire Trek-Segafredo team used single-chainring setups with 52-tooth SRAM Red eTap rings. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Trek-Segafredo used K-Edge Cross Single XL chain catchers. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Double-wrapped handlebar tape for Edward Theuns. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Koen de Kort’s Trek Domane had a GoPro camera mounted beneath the saddle. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Another angle of De Kort’s GoPro and K-Edge mount. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Trek-Segafredo mounted 30mm Bontrager tires for the cobbles. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Several teams used Topeak’s D2 digital pressure gauge. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
The UCI’s motor fraud checkups went on all morning. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Many teams ditched carbon for aluminum Elite Ciussi Gel cages. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Oliver Le Gac of Groupama FDJ had Shimano Di2 climber switches peaking through his tape. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Matteo Trentin had Shimano Di2 Climber switches mounted to the front of his bars. Photo Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
The tradition at Roubaix calls for a 42-tooth small ring up front due to the flat terrain. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Shimano Di2 remote climbing shifters were everywhere. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Sunweb ran 28mm tires. Plenty of clearance with the Cervelo R3 Disc. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Extra electrical tape to secure Asbjorn Kragh Andersen’s bike computer. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Sunweb used disc brakes with the RAT quick-release thru-axle. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Lotto-Soudal’s rubber: Vittoria Corsa Control 28mmm tubular. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Benoot and other Lotto-Soudal riders used K-Edge pro chain catchers. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Thick tape and Campagnolo electronic shifting for Tiesj Benoot. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Jens Keukeleire needed no cush: integrated stem/bars and just one layer of tape. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Lotto-Soudal is using C-Bear ceramic bearings this year. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Sep Vanmarcke opted for stiffness with this one-piece FSA Metron 6D integrated stem/handlebar. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
EF Education First opted for disc brakes with quick-release through axles. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Wout van Aert’s Bianchi Oltre with a bar-mounted brake on the right side. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Peter Sagan was one of several riders debuting Specialized’s much-hyped new Roubaix. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
Who else? Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com
Paris-Roubaix tech
After a long day of dust and cobblestones, a well-deserved shower. Photo: Fred Dreier | VeloNews.com