Soil samples from races won by Eddy Merckx. Shredded skinsuits from Quick-Step. Broken handlebars from the fatal crash of 1970 world champion Jean-Pierre Monseré. These are but a few relics stored in the multistory Koers Cycling Museum in Roeselare, Belgium.

Bring your bike, and an appetite. There are bike lockers, showers, a cafe, and scores of great cycling routes that leave from the front door.

For a quick virtual tour of the Koers Cycling Museum, scroll through the gallery below.

Koers Cycling Museum
The Koers Cycling Museum in Roeselare, Belgium hosts a treasure trove of race memorabilia. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
How many cycling world champions came from your hometown? In Roeselare, the answer is four. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
The WolfPack photo exhibit took prime spot in the Koers Museum during the classics, featuring the photography of Sigfrid Eggers, who spent a year with Deceuninck-Quick-Step. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Bike racing ain’t easy. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Dwars door het Hageland. Because gravel. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Post Strade Bianche. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
A bike from Italian legend Fausto Coppi hangs in the Koers. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Hey! Fausto rode a sub-compact! (Not really — that small ring behind the 52t big ring isn’t small at all.) Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Clamp-on pump pegs. If Fausto did it, why can’t you? Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Fausto’s bottle. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
From hairnets to Shimano Di2, and seemingly everything in between. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Trophies abound at Koers, from Belgian races and international races won by Belgians. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
The Book of Merckx. Congregation please turn to chapter 3, verse 4. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
What do you do with soil samples from races four decades ago? Put them in a museum, of course. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Jean-Pierre Monsere won the 1970 worlds, and died tragically soon after in a race when he hit a car. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Pieces from Monsere’s bike after his fatal collision. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
TT bikes have come a long way. Below the Alan is a curious pile of drugs, illustrating what was and wasn’t allowed. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Like the rest of cycling, saddles have come a long way. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Remember when you could only follow racing on the radio and the newspapers? (Okay, that was before my time, too.) Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Koers has a huge library of books, magazines, newspapers, and posters. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
The Koers archives are deep, with media from all over the world. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Obscure race posters from local events? Yeah, Koers has those. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Archiving history is an ongoing task. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
An interactive exhibit shows all the cycling monuments around Belgium, and you can click in for photos and details. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Koers has multiple floors of cycling history in a restored firehouse in Roeselare. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Want some cycling gag gifts? The Koers gift shop has you covered. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Elixer de Roulers, and all your other cycling-themed alcoholic beverages. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
You don’t have to climb them to buy the markers. But it would be cooler if you did. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
So much cycling. So much beer. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
Malt + Molteni = Malteni. Also, Kwaremont is brewed by the local Brouwerij De Brabandere. The 6.6% ABV matches the average gradient of a section of the Oude Kwaremont. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum464
Alright, enough history — let’s ride! Koers has bike cages with digital locks and showers — plus a huge array of bike routes starting from the front door. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Koers Cycling Museum
And afterward, a meal and a beer at the Koers cafe. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif