Big numbers are the thing this spring.

At the Tour of Flanders, 15 of the 25 teams raced 28mm tubulars, a width that, until recently, had been reserved for only Paris-Roubaix. Big rings were common, with many riders choosing a 54T, including world champion Alejandro Valverde (Movistar). And big cassettes are also in vogue, with 11-30T Shimano and Campagnolo models in wide use — plus the 10-33T models on SRAM eTap AXS bikes.

After winning Gent-Wevelgem on 28mm tubeless tires, Alexander Kristoff (UAE Team Emirates) took the Flanders start aboard the same set-up, running 0.5bar/7psi lower pressure than he does with tubulars.

For saddles, Specialized was the story, with Power models under non-sponsored riders and the new Mimic women’s saddle under Bora’s Marcus Burghardt.

Scroll through the gallery below for a close look at the special bikes of Peter Sagan, 2018 winner Niki Terpstra, and Mathieu van der Poel, plus other cobbles tech from the start of De Ronde van Vlaanderen in Antwerp, Belgium.

Tour of Flanders tech
Sagan has tear-off strips on his race notes. Note the piece of grip tape at the upper right, used to pull of the first section notes. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
National and world champions toe the start line at the Tour of Flanders. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Sagan fiddles with his stem-mounted race notes. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Sagan uses 7.3bar(105psi) / 7.5bar (109psi) in his 28mm Specialized tubulars. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
This number isn’t going up the road without the field marking it. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
This Wahoo Elemnt Bolt has seen some impressive data, wouldn’t you think? Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Shrink wrap keeps wires and hoses tidy on Sagan’s bike. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Aged like a fine wine … Okay, a young wine. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Jens Debusschere (Katusha-Alpecin) uses a bit of tape for more traction with his cleats. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Wout van Aert (Jumbo-Visma) has 6.7bar/97psi in his 28mm Vittoria Corsa tubulars. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
The most popular width at the Tour of Flanders. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Five teams chose 25mm tubulars. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Niki Terpstra (Direct Energie) won the 2018 Ronde van Vlaanderen. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Terpstra’s cobbles fork. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Instead of a big climbing switch for remote shifting of his Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 drivetrain, Terpstra prefers sprint shifters. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Niki Terpstra’s wide tires, and the surface they were designed for. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
“Yeah this new helmet is good for anyone who has a brain,” said Mads Petersen (Trek-Segafredo). “I don’t have one, though, so maybe I will get another model.”
Tour of Flanders tech
Mathieu van der Poel likes to have his name on everything, his Corendon-Circus team said. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
The Specialized Power is a popular saddle in the pro peloton. It’s probably the most commonly seen non-sponsor-correct saddle. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Yet another Specialized Power on a non-Specialized-sponsored bike. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Bora’s Marcus Burghardt is racing on Specialized’s new women’s saddle, the Mimic. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Van Der Poel’s Dutch champion Canyon. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Name tag, #2. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Name tag, #3. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Name tag, #4. (“The stuff is all the same as that of the team, but in his mind it helps to have his name on it,” a team spokesperson said.) Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Sagan’s straightforward 53/39T Dura-Ace crank with Specialized power meter. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Cofidis is racing on pro-only Michelin Power tubulars. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Cofidis mechanics used codes to keep track of tubular widths, which aren’t listed on these pro-only tires. This one is a 27mm. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Wanty-Gobert Cycling has more than a few 54T rings on their Stages LR Dura-Ace cranks. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Astana is racing on Wolfpack Tires, a brand started by a German tire whiz who designed compounds and tires for Continental, Specialized, and Schwalbe. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
A 54T ring? Yep, Astana’s on that train, too. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Deceuninck-Quick Step races 26mm Specialized Hell of the North tubulars, which have a wider casing than the company’s standard tubulars. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
A 50×10 gear is bigger than a 53×11, although visually it might not appear that way. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
SRAM’s 10-28t cassette has redefined what normal chainrings look like in the pro peloton. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
A little tape to keep things from rattling. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
World champion Alejandro Valverde (Movistar) may have a small frame, but the gears are huge. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
A 54T ring for the world champ, with graphics that only one rider can have on his Power2max meter. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Although some riders deviated from the team norm, 15 of the 25 teams at De Ronde used 28mm tires. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Michael Matthews’s Tour of Flanders race bike looked like a smooth-pavement race bike: A Cervélo S5. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
The S5’s distinctive cockpit. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Matthews pushed a 54T big ring with an 11-30T cassette. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Alexander Kristoff (UAE) won Gent-Wevelgem on tubeless tires, and he started the Tour of Flanders with the same set-up. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Kristoff ran 5.5bar (80psi) front / 6bar (87psi) rear pressure on his 28mm tubeless tires. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif
Tour of Flanders tech
Kristoff runs 0.5bar/7psi higher pressure when racing tubulars. Photo: Ben Delaney / Roll Massif