Maxx Chance
303 Project’s Maxx Chance’s Scott Foil setup may not look out of the ordinary at first glance. But his size 54cm frame is paired with a super long 140mm stem (Chance said that was the longest stem he could find). His seatpost too is extended as high as possible, above the minimum insertion point Chance runs a small frame size for his height (5’10”), since, as he says, he’s got long limbs and a short torso. .Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
140mm stem
140mm of fury on Maxx Chance’s cockpit. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Minimum insertion
Chance’s seatpost extends beyond the minimum insertion mark. His saddle height is a whopping 79.5cm. Don’t try this at home. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Snub nose saddle
Chance’s snub nose saddle is in keeping with a growing trend in the peloton. The saddle’s shorter length and wider nose allow the rider to move freely around the saddle and find a comfortable forward position. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Oversize pulleys
Chance’s teammate Isaiah Newkirk runs oversize derailleur pulleys, a small (but pricey) watt savings since the chain does less bending , thereby reducing friction. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
That thing UCI legal?
Sometimes motor doping is okay. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Jelly Belly's farewell tour
We’ll certainly miss this paint job. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Jelly Belly
The most delicious bikes in the peloton? Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Shimano 105
Think you need the top of the line gear to go fast? Think again. Team Jelly Belly bikes are outfitted with Shimano’s workhorse 105 groupsets. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod
All EF-Drapac riders were on board Cannondale’s lightweight climbing bike, the SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Frankenbike
Joe Dombrowski was running aero handlebars on his SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod during stage 3 of the Colorado Classic. Every gain matters: Dombrowski spent a good portion of the day in the break. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Red zone
The single red spoke on Dombrowski’s bike isn’t a style choice. That’s low mechanics keep track of a wheel that’s had a spoke replaced. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Snubbed
Dombrowski runs a snub nose Prologo saddle. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Taylor Phinney's stem
The pros ride the bikes that you and I ride…with some notable customizations. Taylor Phinney’s FSA stem, for example, features a dramatic length and drop to accommodate his lanky frame. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
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Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Travis McCabe's Orbea
Travis McCabe, fresh off a dominant performance at the Tour of Utah, started Stage 3 at the Colorado Classic on board this Orbea Orca. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Travis McCabe's Orbea
A small personal touch adorns McCabe’s top tube. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Tolerant, tightly
McCabe’s Pioneer power meter leaves little room for error on the non-drive side. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Snubbed again
Sensing a theme? McCabe also runs a snub-nose saddle. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Sparklepony paint job
Israel Cycling Academy bikes feature a pretty sweet sparkle paint job. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Big ol' map
When you really need directions but forgot your reading glasses at home… Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Toms Skujins' Trek Madone
It was only a few short weeks ago that Trek-Segafredo’s Toms Skujins was making a name for himself at the Tour de France. He started stage 3 on board his disc-equipped Trek Madone.Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
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Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Eisenhart's BMC
TJ Eisenhart animated the Colorado Classic in 2017 but has been quiet this year. He was riding this BMC Teammachine. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Snub!
Eisenhart is a snub-nose subscriber too. He runs the Pro Stealth saddle. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Love
Some mid-stage reminders. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Battle scars
Eisenhart’s shifters have taken the brunt of some impacts, it seems. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
TJ Eisenhart's BMC
Despite his tall frame, Eisenhart runs a size 54cm frame. Often pros will ride smaller frames to take advantage of increased stiffness and power transfer. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Huffman the bikepacker
Evan Huffman seems to be channeling his inner bikepacker with some seriously flared out brake levers. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Huffman's levers
For comparison, here’s the bike sitting next to Huffman’s. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Huffman's Diamondback
Huffman laughs in the face of the snub-nose saddle crowd with this triathlon saddle. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Hugh Carthy's flashy kicks
EF-Drapac’s Hugh Carthy was sporting some flashy red Vittoria shoes for stage 3. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
EF Drapac shoe game
Taylor Phinney customized his Giro shoes with full laces. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com
Taylor Phinney's Cannondale SystemSix
Taylor Phinney’s backup bike for stage 3 is his Cannondale SystemSix. There was enough climbing to get Phinney on his lighter climbing bike, the SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com