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Pro Bike Gallery: Richie Porte’s BMC Teammachine SLR01

By Dan Cavallari • Updated
While BMC recently launched a number of new bikes, the Teammachine SLR01 remains the bike of choice for Team BMC riders, including Richie Porte. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com

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At only 5-foot-6, Porte rides a small frame. His seat height is marked with paint pen. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
Have we mentioned Porte is small in stature? His handlebars are quite narrow; the width wasn’t clearly written anywhere on the bars, but it wouldn’t be surprising if Porte ran 38cm bars, 40cm at the largest. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
Leash your pets…and your Garmin. You know that little loop of string you threw away when you bought your GPS computer? The pros use it so their computers don’t disappear should they get tangled up in a crash. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
Porte runs short, 170mm cranks. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
While BMC recently launched a number of new bikes, the Teammachine SLR01 remains the bike of choice for Team BMC riders, including Richie Porte. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
The stem hides the Shimano Di2 wires, but the brake cable and housing runs externally until it enters the frame on the top tube. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
Fizik’s Arione R1 Open provides a place for Porte to sit for the next three weeks. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
Vittoria’s Corsa tires are a growing presence on pro bikes. the supple cotton-casing tire is mounted to Shimano’s Dura-Ace C35 wheels. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
Porte attaches his Garmin Edge 1030 to a K-Edge mount. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
The brake levers appear to be adjusted inward, presumably to accommodate the size of Porte’s hands. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
The magnet for Shimano’s Dura-Ace power meter crank attaches to the bottom bracket shell. It’s self-adhesive, but it never hurts to have redundant systems. In this case, the red tape blends nicely with the frame. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
Team mechanics told us this is indeed Porte’s race bike, though it’s easy to change out cranks and chainrings depending on the course of the day. In preparation for the day’s training ride, Porte runs a 53/39 chainring combo. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
Out back, Porte runs an 11-30 cassette. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com
There isn’t much new or notable to show about the Teammachine, but it sure is a sleek ride. The Di2 junction box integrates cleanly into the down tube. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews.com

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